Orissa Supercyclones

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  • Topic: Tropical cyclone, Storm, Cyclone
  • Pages : 3 (616 words )
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  • Published : September 30, 2010
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ORISSA SUPERCYCLONE

CONTENTS:-

➢ INTRODUCTION

➢ METEROLOGICAL HISTORY

➢ IMPACTS

1. PHYSICAL DESTRUCTION

2. HEALTH

➢ MAIN CAUSES OF WIDESPREAD DAMAGES

➢ MEASURES TAKEN BY GOVERNMENT

1. RELIEF

2. REHABILITATION

➢ MEASURES TAKEN BY NGO’s

➢ DISASTER PREPAREDNESS PROJECTS

➢ CONCLUSION

INTRODUCTION:-

Orissa has a total population of nearly 35 million people. In normal times, of these, 60% live below the poverty level. Almost 90% of the population live in rural areas. More than 50% of the children below the age of 4 are suffering from malnutrition. Nearly 90% have access to safe water, but only 4% have sanitation. Health statistics are reported to be incomplete. However, under 5 mortality and maternal mortality is reported to be high and measles vaccination coverage around 60%. Cholera and Malaria are endemic.

The 1999 Orissa cyclone, also known as Cyclone 05B, and Paradip cyclone, was the deadliest Indian Ocean tropical cyclone since the 1991 Bangladesh cyclone and deadliest Indian storm since 1971. The storm made landfall just weeks after a Category 4 storm hit the same general area.

Millions of people remained homeless and over 20 thousand dead in the century's worst cyclone that ripped through coastal Orissa. Super-cyclone with winds 260-300 km/hour (hurricane category 5) hit the 90 mile coast of Orissa with a storm surge that created the Bay-of-Bengal water level 30 feet higher than normal. The water rushed violently to submerge the coastal areas including the port city of Paradip and areas within 30 km from the shore. The escaping water was 15 feet deep.

A tropical depression formed over the Malay Peninsula on October 25. It moved to the northwest and became a tropical storm on October 26. It continued to strengthen into a cyclone on the 27th. On October 28, it became a severe cyclone with a peak of 160 mph (260 km/h) winds. It hit India the next...
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