Organizational Analysis on American Heart Association

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I will be discussing in detail the reason and foundation of the American Heart Association, the functions and responsibilities of the American Heart Association, the stakeholders’ impact towards the American Heart Association, and how the stakeholders affect the American Heart Association and the impact it has on the American Heart Association. I future will be discussing in detail the different types of stakeholders’ and its responsibilities. The American Heart Association in the early days began a ground-breaking group of physicians and social workers and they created the first Association for Prevention and Relief of Heart Disease in New York in 1915. At this time heart disease patients were considered predestined, and were forced or limited to homebound; bed rest. These physicians and social workers conducted a study in Boston and New York to find out whether heart disease patients could return to normal activities. These types of studies continued in Chicago and Philadelphia and it eventually evolved into the heart association in 1920s. The studies continued and their main goal was to educate and share information following the research they’ve conducted. This information was later shared with other cities across the United States and Canada to promote additional studies. These six cardiologists founded the American Heart Association in 1924 and continued to help hundreds, then thousands, of people. The founders were Drs. Lewis A. Conner and Robert H. Halsey of New York; Paul D. White of Boston; Joseph Sailer of Philadelphia; Robert B. Preble of Chicago; and Hugh D. McCulloch of St. Louis. Drs. James B. Herrick of Chicago and William S. Thayer of Baltimore were also influential in the early planning. Dr. White, president of the AHA in 1941, once described the early years as a time of "almost unbelievable ignorance" about heart disease.
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