Page 1 of 17

Organizational Analysis

Continues for 16 more pages »
Read full document

Organizational Analysis

  • By
  • September 15, 2013
  • 5885 Words
  • 3 Views
Page 1 of 17
ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS: GREEN RIVER VS. ABERDEEN

Although Green River and Aberdeen are part of the same corporation, they operate as separate organizations, each with its own structure and culture. Kenneth Dailey, site manager for Green River, sent some of the employees from his facility to observe the organizational structure and culture at Aberdeen. Aberdeen’s unusual structure and culture has made its operations system a model studied by observation teams at a rate of twice per month. (Clawson, James G., 2007) Dailey wants to know if despite the obvious differences between their organizations, would the Aberdeen system, as a whole or in part, work at Green River. Introduction and Background Green River The FMC Corporation (“FMC”) was founded in 1883 and is one of the world’s leading diversified chemical companies. FMC is a leader in the agricultural, industrial and consumer markets. FMC is the world’s largest producer of natural soda ash. By products include “sodium bicarbonate, sodium cyanide, sodium sesquicarbonate and caustic soda.” (FMC Corporation > Corporate Profile, 2005) Green River is part of FMC’s Alkali Chemicals division that produces natural soda ash. Aberdeen is part of FMC’s Naval Systems Division (“NSD”) and the sole supplier of the U.S. Navy’s surface-ship missile canisters. Green River opened its first plant in 1948. Green River has more than 100 domestic and international products and customers. Green River has approximately 1,150 employees and a working relationship with the United Steel Workers of America. (Clawson, James G., 2007) Considering the time of Green River’s inception, it is safe to assume the organizational structure, design and culture is traditional. It is also safe to assume that the organizational design and/or culture was derived from the military training Green River’s creators obtain while serving

in World War II (“WWII”). Therefore, the power and the praise rested at the top of the organizational chart. (Van...