Organization Structure and Culture

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Organizational Structures and Culture

By
Duncan Roy Wood
Submitted to
Dr David Chu

Contents
Title page
Introduction
1. Organisational Structure and Culture
1. Compare and Contrast Organisational Structure
2. Relationship between an Organisation’s Structure and Culture and Effects on Business Performance 3. Factors that Influence Individual Behaviour at Work
2. Approaches to Management and Leadership
1. How Organisational Theory Underpins Principles and Practices of Organising and of Management 2. Different Approaches to Management and Theories of Organisations 3. Differeent Leadership Styles and Leadership Approaches

3. Motivational Theories
3.1 Different Motivational Theories
3.2 Relationship between Motivation Theory and the Practice of Management 4. Working with Others, Teamwork, Groups and Group Dynamics
1. Nature of Groups and Group Behaviour within Organisations 2. Factors that lead to Teamwork and Influence that Threatens Success 3. Impact of Technology on team Functioning within an Organisation Conclusion

Reference

Introduction
A developed organisational structure and culture can be at the forefront when it comes to instituting and integrating the structure and culture throughout the entire organisation. The way a structure and culture is designed or evolves over time affects the way people and groups behave withiin the organisation. What are the employees needs within the culture of the organisation and what should a manager do to motivate his employees 1. Organisational Structure and Culture.

An organisation in general can be defined as the rational co-ordination of the activities of a number of people for the achievement of some common explicit purpose or goal, through division of labour and function and through a hierarchy of authority and responsibility.. 1. Compare and Contrast Organisational Structure

An organisation in general can be defined as the rational co-ordination of the activities of a number of people for the achievement of some common explicit purpose or goal, through division of labour and function and through a hierarchy of authority and responsibility. The culture within an organisation affects the way that it operates and its members behave. One type of culture is not necessarily better than another, although one type of culture might be more appropriate than others in particular circumstances. For example, a role culture could have difficulty in adapting to change. In contrast, power culture or task culture are probably more effective in conditions of change. For example, organisation A, this organisation is an engineering company. This organisation structure is characterized by high formalization, a limited information network, and centralization. Managers are expected to fully document all decisions. Creative decisions that incur significant change or risk are not encouraged because managers of failed projects are openly criticized and penalized. Managers try not to implement ideas that deviate much from the status. Management is concerned with high productivity, regardless of the impact on employee morale or turnover. Work activities are designed around individuals. Organisation B, is also an engineering company. This company’s structure is flat, uses cross hierarchical and cross-functional teams, has low formalizationm, possesses a comprehensive information network, and relies on participative decision making. Here, however, management encourages and rewards risk taking and change. Decisions based on intuition are valued as much as those that are well rationalized. Management prides itself on its history of experimenting with new technologies and its success in regularly introducing innovation products. Managers or employees who have a good idea are encouraged to – run with it. Failures are...
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