Org Behavior

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.Introduction.....................................................................................5 1.1Types organizational justice......................................................6 1.2Concepts....................................................................................8

2.Organizational justice perception.....................................................9 2.1 Antecedents...............................................................................10 2.1 Outcomes...................................................................................12 3.Conclusion.......................................................................................14


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Organizational justice theory examines individuals’ perceptions of fairness in their employment relationship (Colquitt, Greenberg, & Zapata-Phelan, 2005). The topic of organizational justice has become one of the most popular and most researched areas in the fields of organization and management. In management and organization research, the terms “justice” and “fairness” are often used interchangeably, such as when referring to “organizational justice” and “organizational fairness” perceptions. Organizational justice is an important part of interpersonal relations among people in the workplace. Employees monitor the fairness of processes, outcomes, and interpersonal treatment in their organizations. When employees see that their organization is being fair, then four important individual needs are met for them: the need for belonging, the need for meaning, the need for positive self-regard, and the need for control (Cropanzano, Byrne, Bobocel, & Rupp, 2001). Organizational justice helps (1) fulfill people’s desire for important attachments to others in their organizations, (2) bring employees closer together and have a strong sense of pride in their organization, (3) fulfill employees’ need for things to be “done right” and with a sense of morality, and (4) enable employees to have a more positive view of themselves and who they are in their organization.


1. INTRODUCTION

Greenberg (1987) introduced organizational justice with regard to how an employee judges the behaviour of the organization and their resulting attitude and behaviour that comes from this. E.g. If a firm makes redundant half of the workers at your firm you will feel a sense of injustice and your attitude towards work will drop and so will your productivity. Justice or fairness refers to the idea that an action or decision is morally right, which may be defined according to ethics, religion, fairness, equity, or law. People are naturally attentive to the justice of events and situations in their everyday lives, across a variety of contexts. Individuals react to actions and decisions made by organizations every day. An individual’s perceptions of these decisions as fair or unfair can influence the individual’s subsequent attitudes and behaviours. Fairness is often of central interest to organizations because the implications of perceptions of injustice can impact job attitudes and behaviours at work. Justice in organizations can include issues related to perceptions of fair play, equal opportunities for promotion, and personnel selection procedures.


1.1TYPES OF ORGANIZATION JUSTICE

Three main proposed components of organizational justice are distributive, procedural, and interactional justice (which includes informational and interpersonal justice).

Distributive justice
Distributive justice is conceptualized as the fairness associated with decision outcomes and distribution of resources. The outcomes or resources distributed may be tangible (e.g., pay) or intangible (e.g., praise). Perceptions of distributive justice can be fostered when outcomes are perceived to be equally applied.

Procedural justice
Procedural justice is defined as the fairness of the processes that lead to outcomes. When individuals...
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