Order: Non-commissioned Officer and Lawful Orders

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Following Lawful Orders
Lawful orders are given for a reason and you should always obey them. For starters you should always obey lawful orders because you took an oath to do so when you joined the military. A lawful order must be followed, and done so in a timely manner. If you disagree with a lawful order, you must still follow it; you are required to follow a lawful order before you are permitted to question it. All officers and non commissioned officers appointed over you are held responsible for you and are in the keeping of the traditions and doctrines of the armed forces of the United States of America. Discipline is the only way to get a large group of people to do something that could make or break them. The military is all about discipline, which is obeying a lawful order. Military discipline and effectiveness is built on the foundation of obedience to orders. Soldiers are taught to obey immediately, and without question, orders from their superiors. If you fail to obey lawful orders there are many consequences. You could get an article 90 of the UCMJ, which makes it a crime to willfully disobey a superior commissioned officer. Article 91 of the UCMJ, makes it a crime to willfully disobey a superior noncommissioned or warrant officer. Article 92 of the UCMJ, makes it a crime to disobey any lawful order. It does not have to be “willful” under a article 92. The military recognizes that respect for authority is what maintains order and prevent the eruption of chaos and is hence willing to set an example for all who might be tempted to oppose their leaders, by administering punishment first hand without any judicial representatives. The Army and our commanding officers have our best interest at hand and they put in place the orders that they do for that reason.
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