Optical Fibers with 200-Micron Coating

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  • Topic: Optical fiber, Optical fiber cable, Optical fiber connector
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  • Published : May 6, 2013
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optical fibers with 200-micron coating

February 19, 2013
Lightwave Staff

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OFS has unveiled its AllWave FLEX and AllWave FLEX+ Bend-Optimized Single-Mode Fiber that features a 200-μm coating. The coating enables a narrower fiber than those using conventional 250-μm coatings. OFS will use the fiber in fiber-optic cables with higher fiber counts and in microcables, beginning with its new MiDia 2FX microcables.

The thinner coating does not affect the fiber’s bend optimization, so the fibers can support tight, low-loss bends without weakening fiber strength and long-term reliability, OFS asserts.

The AllWave FLEX version of the 200-μm fiber will bring its space saving benefits, as well as resistance to macrobend and microbend losses, to fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) deployments, enterprise networks, and other applications requiring small bend diameters. It is an ITU-T G.657.A1 fiber.

Meanwhile, the AllWave FLEX+ 200-μm fiber will benefit in-building and connectivity applications, and offers full compatibility and compliance with the current installed base of conventional ITU-T G.652 singlemode fibers. It also can be used within fiber cables for access networks, including high-density FTTH applications, as well as cell sites, enterprise networks, and similar scenarios. It exceeds both ITU-T G.657-A2 and G.652.D recommendations and International Standard IEC 60793-2-50 specifications, OFS asserts.

With the ability to occupy 46% less area than conventional fiber, OFS predicts significant benefits for applications that require more fiber per cable or where conduit or duct space is at a premium.

For example, the fibers will enable the MiDia 2FX microcables potentially to reduce fiber-optic network build costs by increasing installation distance, reducing the number of installations, and maximizing the use of congested and limited availability ducts, OFS predicts.

MiDia 2FX cable is being presented at the FTTH Council Europe’s FTTH Conference in London February 20-21 at stand G18. The cable is generally available

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50µ Multimode Duplex Fiber Optic Cable|
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How Fiber Optic Cables Work
The traditional method of data transmission over copper cables is accomplished by transmitting electrons over a copper conductor. Fiber Optic cables transmit a digital signal via pulses of light through a very thin strand of glass. Fiber strands (the core of the fiber optic cable) are extremely thin, no thicker than a human hair. The core is surrounded by a cladding which reflects the light back into the core and eliminates light from escaping the cable.A fiber optic chain works in the following manner. At the one end, the fiber cable is connected to a transmitter. The transmitter converts electronic pulses into light pulses and sends the optical signal through the fiber cable. At the other end, the fiber cable is plugged into a receiver which decodes the optical signal back into digital pulses.Multimode vs Singlemode Fiber A "mode" in Fiber Optic cable refers to the path in which light travels. Multimode cables have a larger core diameter than that of...
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