Oppositional Defiant Disorder Case Studycase Study

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Table of Contents

Title:Page:

Special Education in Ireland1

What is Oppositional Defiant Disorder?(ODD)3

What Causes ODD?3

Symptoms of ODD4

How Is ODD Diagnosed?4

What is the Treatment for ODD?5

Prognosis 5

Emotional and Practical Implications on the Family5

Resources Available6

Role of the Interdisciplinary Team7

Elements of Good Practice7

Conclusion and Personal Learnin8

Bibliography 8

Appendices

Special Education in Ireland

Prior to the 1990’s Special Education was entirely in the hands of religious orders. In the mid 1980’s the worldwide push highlighting the need to integrate children with special needs into main-stream schools helped influence the Irish Educational policy. With the decline of religious orders in education, the responsibility of educating children with special needs was appointed to government officials such as the Department of Education and Science (DES) as well as other corresponding agencies. Ireland became increasingly aware that they were well behind other countries when it came to making provisions for children with special needs. This resulted in an increase of changes to legislation and structural activity.

Major Publications and Legislation's where put in place to address the education of children with special needs, such as

“The Report of the Special Education Review Committee” (SERC 1993) which dealt with the educational implications of special needs.

“The Education Act” 1998 directly outlined the government's rights and legal obligations regarding education. It provided the first legal definitions of “disability”, (Pt.1 Sec.2), special educational needs, and what it meant by support services. It ensured all children with a disability would be protected ( Pt. 1 Sec. 6,a) and that the Minister for Education would allocate funding for school, support centres and services for people with a disability (PT. 2 Sec. 6b).

The National Disabilities Authority Act 1999 provides for the establishment of a body, to be known as the National Disability Authority (NDA) to assist the Minister for Health through various functions (Part1 Sec. 8), the most relevant being: Issuing a Strategic Plan every 3 years.(Pt. 2 Sec.9)

The power to request information from any body providing services to a person with disability.(Pt. 2 Sec.14)

The Education Welfare Act 2000 (EWA) resulted in the creation of the Education Welfare Board (EWB) who highlighted the relevance of regular attendance and helped insure all children attended school or received appropriate education. Often Children with special educational needs (SEN) are poor attendees, the EWB investigate the causes and implement ways to improve the learning environment for everyone involved.

The Equal Status Act 2000 promotes equality for anyone legally entitled to education and obliges providers to do all that is reasonable to accommodate the needs of persons with a disability. It prohibits discrimination on nine different grounds, disability being one of them. People with SEN are entitled to attend any course they want unless their disability would have detrimental consequences to others in the class. It also requires provisions to protect students and staff from harassment.

The Education for Persons with Special Needs Act 2004 (EPSEN) is the most significant piece of legislation relating to special needs in education and provides that children are to be educated in an inclusive setting unless this would not be in the child’s best interests or would have detrimental effects on other children in mainstream education. Education for children with special needs may be provided in ordinary classes or special classes in mainstream schools or in special schools. Preparation of Independent Education Plans (IEP), assessment of SEN, the provision of services for...
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