Online Recruitment Goes Virtual

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Publication: The Business Times, p 12
Date: 2 January 2012
Headline: Online recruitment goes virtual

Online recruitment goes virtual
Quantine has come up with a p ortal that allows firms to hire faster and at lower cost. By Teh Shi Ning

E

CHOING the calls for "cheaper, better, faster" workers,
HR solutions start-up Quantine is offering an online recruitment platform which it thinks will help employers hire "better,
faster, stronger".
And its founders, Daryl Low, 30, and
Kenneth Yap, 28, have ambitious plans for
the two-and-a-half-year-old firm to become better, faster and stronger. "We want to compete against the large, established recruitment portals out there, the Monster.coms of this world," Mr Low
says.
It may seem a lofty aspiration for what
started as a firm selling HR departments
skills assessment software, but Quantine
has taken at least one big step towards it.
The duo, who decided to launch this
business after graduating from Singapore
Management University, speak with obvious pride of their latest product, the Next-5.com recruitment networking platform.
They say it has the potential to revolutionise online recruitment, by turning the current "passive" hiring on online job portals on its head with active creation of talent networks "for HR professionalsto connect with, engage, assess and hopefully, hire".

The partnerships with aptitude and
skills assessment providers such as Canada's Walden Testing, to run tests on behalf of human resource departments here, remains at the core of the Next-5.com platform. But the crown jewel of their portal is a

virtual interviewing platform launched
last August. This allows employers to create and store templates of interview questions for various roles. Interested candidates may then access these questions over the portal - as though the interview is

being conducted live - and using a simple
laptop webcarn, record their responses for
the employer's HR team to review at its
time and convenience.
An obvious drawback is that follow-up
questions cannot immediately be asked
unlike in an actual across-the-table interview, but Mr Low and Mr Yap stress that that can still come in final rounds of interviews. What their platform allows for is a more astute first or second cut of all who

apply for any given role.
Mr Low says this fine-tunes what he
has found to be typically inefficient cumbersome recruitment processes, even among larger companies. "As a job applicant, I've seen first-hand how the interview process is so broken. Even for large companies, I've been through several

rounds of i n t e ~ e w swith a different per,
son interviewing me each round, but with
no continuity. They ask the same questions again each round, what is the point of that?" says Mr Low. The video interviews on the other hand, can be stored for review.

Y EN MtNG JllN

DYNAMiC DUO
Mr Y (left) and M Low believe they have a winner in their hands - the Next-5.com recruitment networking platform. Even thou& their ap
r
firm is only two-and-a-half years old, they want to compete against large^, estiblished recruitment portals such as Monster.com

Paired together with its suite of aptitude tests, which can be customised for different roles, Quantine estimates that it
speeds up the entire recruitment process
by 70 per cent, at 10-20per cent of the usual cost.
"Recruiting this way also helps sieve
out the spam," Mr Low says. He speaks
from experience of placing job-ads on online portals seeking only Singapore citizens or permanent residents only. A flood of non-residents' resumes poured in anyway. "So we know there just has to be a better way. If candidates need to take a

test, those who realise they are not up to it
may automaticaIly withdraw," he says.
That way, a HR department only pays for
candidates whose results show that they
fit their bill.
a
"There is a w r for talent, and it is not
in Singapore alone. You may receive
many resumes from...
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