One of the Greatest American Sacrifices for Wwii

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One of the Greatest American Sacrifices for WWII

The year is 1941 and the United States has managed to remain out of the 2nd World War. But on the morning of December 7th, history was changed for the American people. At 7:55am, Japanese militants dropped the first bombs on Pearl Harbor. This is “a date which will live in infamy.” Whether we liked it or not, America was now involved in World War II.

Americans all across the country had to make many sacrifices to help out with the war efforts. There were restrictions placed on consumer goods such as automobiles, electronics, and nylons. Also, there were limitations placed on housing construction. But the greatest sacrifice of all was made by the Japanese Americans. In Mine Okubo’s book Citizen 13660, she describes as well as illustrates her experience as she, and approximately 110,000 other people, were evacuated from the west coast and sent to internment camps all across the country. The number 13660 in the book title comes from Okubo’s family number that was given to her when she registered for her brother and herself. It was to be used to identify their belongings and them as a family unit. On page 26, as she waits to load the bus to be taken to the camp, Okubo says, “At that moment I recalled some of the stories told on shipboard by European refugees bound for America.” In this quote, she is referring to the Jews who are escaping Germany. The stories that were being told are of the concentration camps that the Jews had been sent to. Okubo, along with all the other Japanese Americans, had no idea what was in store for them. Many feared that it would be something very similar to that of the concentration camps in Germany. When they arrived they soon learned that conditions were not as harsh as those the Jews were enduring. But still their experience differed immensely from the rest of the world. They lived in the internment camps and endured the lack of privacy and long lines to get food and to use the...
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