"One Art" Analysis

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"One Art" by Elizabeth Bishop

Elizabeth bishop is an American poet; some of her works include “ a cold spring”, “geography III” “one art” and many more. The genre of these poems is called “villanelles”. One that will be looked at further is one art.

what literally occurs in one art is that the persona proposes that some things are essentially intended to be lost and that losing them shouldn’t be taken that seriously. She states that we become used to loss by working with smaller items like "door keys" or "the hour badly spent" (stanza 2, line 5), so that when larger losses happen we will be prepared for it. Also, as the poem progresses it shifts to higher losses. E.g. close friends, family

the main theme of this poem is that losing love or friendship is really difficult to go through with.

The persona can be marked as maybe old, wise, and full of experiences in life. This can be assumed because, obviously she has lived in many different places and has travelled much due to the fact that she has already "lost two cities" and once "owned two rivers, a continent" (stanza 5, lines 13-14). The persona’s tone towards the subject of loss is detached because she truly knows the feeling within her heart how awful loss feels. This attitude becomes understandable at the end of the poem for it ends with the words "like disaster" (stanza 5, line 19).

The poem's auditory quality is euphonious (sweet-sounding) and pleasant. This effect is produced by words containing long vowels and soft consonants such as "master" and "fluster" and "vaster". Also, a device that creates the pleasing sound of the poem is rhyme words such as "intent" and "spent".

The structure of this poem consists of the villanelle form. It comprises of nineteen lines split up into six stanzas. Three lines are in all the stanzas except the last. The last stanza contains four lines. Furthermore, the rhyme scheme is very particular. All the lines in the poem follow only two end rhymes -either...
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