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On ¨Lady Lazarus¨

By | September 2006
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Resurrected
Being able to comment on Sylvia Plath's poem ¨Lady Lazarus¨, involves coming in contact with the events that shaped her life. She was born in Boston in 1932 and committed suicide in London in 1963. When reading Plath's poetry, especially ¨Lady Lazarus¨, one has to keep in mind that the author was deeply scarred by her fathers death, coincidentally at age 8 when she published her first few verses in a Boston newspaper. By the time she was 18, she entered Smith College on a scholarship, she already had an extraordinary list of publications; while she was at Smith she wrote over 500 poems. In the poem Sylvia personifies her self as the female version of Lazarus, and describes how she ¨strips to death¨, and like Lazarus has been brought back from the death, but unlike Lazarus she keeps playing with death, and later achieving her purpose. In ¨Lady Lazarus¨, Plath expresses her personal pain and mixes it with her poetic work. She uses this union to escape her world of burdens that she had carried since her daddy's death, the one that incremented with her unstable marriage, and the permanent oppression she put on her self by wanting to be perfect.

As many of her other poems, ¨Lady Lazarus¨ mixes in a very subtle manner, Plath's own pain and the world's collective agony. She creates a very interesting spark by mixing her real world to her imaginary world, and creating a meaningful and profound, almost perfect poetry. In her first stanza she talks about her self, she opens the poem with a very bold statement in lines 1 to 3: ¨I have done it again./One year in

every ten/ I manage it----¨, she talks about her pain. While in college, in her early twenties Plath almost succeeds in committing suicide by swallowing sleeping pills. Nearly ten years later, Plath did succeed in her conspiracy against her self. In her second stanza she alludes to the world scarring event, the Holocaust. In lines 4 to 6 :" A sort of walking miracle, my skin/ Bright as a Nazi...
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