On Being Brought from Africa to America vs. an Hymn to the Evening

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In the poems, , they shared many similarities. One similarity is that they both used apostrophes to make their rhythm come together. Some examples would be the words “refin’d, heavn’s, th’angelic, fill’d, and heav’nly.” Another way they compare is that they both use biblical references. Various examples are that in the first poem she ended it with “May be refin’d and join th’angelic train” and also in the second poem she said “Fill’d with the praise of him who gives the light,” both referring to God and the heavens. Throughout both of the poems she expresses how happy she was to be brought to America and be placed in the family she was. Phillis also shows that she was happy to have learned Christianity and that she found God. Those are only a few similarities I noticed, but I’m sure there are plenty more. On Being Brought from Africa to America and An Hymn to the Evening have differences that are shown in many places. Such as in the first poem she is describing how happy she was to be brought to America and to be a Christian. When in the second poem she is saying how thankful she was to be able to wake up every day and have a clean slate. Another way they are different from each other is that they have the same meaning of words, but spelled differently and vice versa. Examples of words with two different meanings and spelled the same is: die- the color, and die- death, but she only uses die, meaning color. One of the last differences I saw was that in the first poem she was showing her thankfulness and expressing her feelings, but in the second poem she is describing her surroundings and her gratefulness of having a refreshed start each morning. These differences make each poem unique and creative.
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