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1. American Dietetic Association Evidence Analysis Library, How do caffeinated beverages affect the need for other fluids in adults?, ADA.  Accessed August 12, 2011. http://www.adaevidencelibrary.com/evidence.cfm?evidence_summary_id=250554. 2. Goldstein, E., et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 2010. 7(1): p. 5.

What's in Coffee?
What you get in your cup of coffee varies with how the beans are grown and how you prepare it. Overall, coffee is a good source of the B vitamin riboflavin, and is also a concentrated source of antioxidant phytochemicals.Coffee contains: * Chlorogenic acid, an antioxidant compound that is the major phenol in coffee * Quinic acid, a phytochemical that contributes to the acidic taste of coffee * Cafestol and kahweol, compounds that are extracted from the beans' oil during brewing. Unfiltered coffee, such as French press or boiled coffee, contains these compounds * Caffeine, a naturally occurring stimulant that affects the central nervous system * N-methylpyridinium (NMB), created by roasting, may make the antioxidants more potentChlorogenic acid may be slightly lower in decaf coffee according to limited research, but it still contains plenty of phytochemicals. Lab studies suggest that instant may be lower in antioxidant potency than brewed coffee, though more research is needed.| Laboratory studies are focusing on coffee beans' lignans and phytochemicals. In cell and animal studies, scientists have identified several phytochemicals that help control cell growth and reduce cancer cell development. * For colorectal cancer, one explanation of why coffee may show protection is its caffeine content. Caffeine may speed carcinogens' passage through the digestive tract, reducing the time our body is exposed to these substances. Cell studies show caffeine may also influence cell signaling to decrease colorectal...