Read full document

Olden Utensils

By | July 2013
Page 1 of 2
Benjamin Thompson noted at the start of the 18th century that kitchen utensils were commonly made of copper, with various efforts made to prevent the copper from reacting with food (particularly its acidic contents) at the temperatures used for cooking, including tinning, enamelling, and varnishing. He observed that iron had been used as a substitute, and that some utensils were made of earthenware.[1] By the turn of the 20th century, Maria Parloa noted that kitchen utensils were made of (tinned or enamelled) iron and steel, copper, nickel, silver, tin, clay, earthenware, and aluminium.[2] The latter, aluminium, became a popular material for kitchen utensils in the 20th century.[3]

A partially overlapping category of tools is that of eating utensils, which are tools used for eating (c.f. the more general category oftableware). Some utensils are both kitchen utensils and eating utensils. Cutlery (i.e. knives and other cutting implements) can be used for both food preparation in a kitchen and as eating utensils when dining. Other cutlery such as forks and spoons are both kitchen and eating utensils.

Non-stick pans are cooking pans made from or coated with materials designed to prevent food from sticking to their surface during the cooking process. Most non-stick pans are made using polytetrafluoroethylene (e.g. DuPont's Teflon) coating although newer materials are also used. Health concerns have been raised regarding use of PTFE as a cooking pan coating. Pressure cooking is the process of cooking food, using water or other cooking liquid, in a sealed vessel—known as a pressure cooker, which does not permit air or liquids to escape below a pre-set pressure. Pressure cookers are used for cooking food quicker than conventional cooking methods, which also saves energy.

Olden days:
Preserved examples of various forms of spoons used by the ancient Egyptians include those composed of ivory, flint, slate and wood; many of them carved with religious...
Hide

Rate this document

What do you think about the quality of this document?

Share this document

Let your classmates know about this document and more at Studymode.com