Old Man and the Sea Term Paper

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The Analysis of The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Through times of struggle, humans resort to memories and ideas to help them through conflict and adversity. In The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway’s protagonist, Santiago relies on his connection with the sea and with nature, his relationship with a young boy, and past memories and dreams to get through his struggles with a large marlin, which he catches after 84 days with no fish. Ernest Hemingway uses Santiago’s courage, love of nature and his experience to help him overcome adversity.

The novel takes place mostly outdoors and at sea. This setting is important, because the sea and nature both are important parts of Santiago’s life. Santiago makes a living off of the sea. He also feels a strong connection with both the sea and nature. The sea is what makes Santiago’s life worth living and is ironically what causes his adversity. Santiago uses the sea to take his mind off the pain he experiences in his body, but the sea is also what causes that pain. In the beginning of the novel, he was depicted as old but cheerful. Everything about him was old, except for his eyes. They were the same color as the sea, cheerful, and undefeated. Yet later in the novel, his vision got blurry because he was sick, dehydrated, and worn out because of his struggle with the large marlin. Also, “he always thought of the sea as la mar which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her... The old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favors, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them” (Hemingway 29). Unlike many others, the old man loves and respects the sea, because he sees its beauty. Despite the struggle the sea creates for him, he knows that it only creates hardships because it can not prevent them. The old man also uses nature to calm himself down, so he stops worrying about the hunger and pain (Hemingway 109). This is also...
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