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By | October 2012
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Reading Response to Gandhi's Idea of Celibacy
Gandhi's essay, “Brahmacharya” explains the idea that celibacy can bring both good physical and mental health, that contraceptives are not beneficial to society, and how celibacy makes the world a better place. He talks about how parents should not make their kids get married young and gives advice to married couples on how to practice Brahmacharya (550-555).

The purpose of this essay is to promote celibacy in married and non-married individuals, convince parents to not marry their children young and fight against the idea of contraceptives. The audience of this essay would be married individuals, parents, young people looking for the key to happiness, older folks looking to face death without fear, and people interested in achieving a higher state of being. He addresses parents in great depth because they are the ones raising the future Brahmachari. If he is able to sway them, he will be able to sway the children.

Gandhi starts of his essay with a definition of what Brahmacharya is (500). The definition is important because it is not a common word at all. This addition helps the reader know how to feel about that world.Next, Gandhi uses contrast when he looks at behavior in his own culture in relation to Western Culture. He believes that contraceptives in Western Culture would deny the men the need to overcome their sexual desires and would, therefore, set aside their respect for women by treating them like sex objects (552). This comparison is faulty. India during that time was getting increasingly frisky. They produced the Kama Sutra and had a rather sexual culture as a whole. He also demonstrates comparison through metaphor when he compares a broken mirror with lost vitality (553). The metaphor was not very effective, because the comparison is ridiculous. First off, vitality is supposed to be an energy that obviously be restored. A broken mirror is a broken mirror; it cannot be simply healed with time....