Off-Shore Processing Australia

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  • Topic: Refugee, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Australia
  • Pages : 7 (1921 words )
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  • Published : April 15, 2013
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Offshore Processing in Australia

Prepared by Anita Schenk

31/10/2012

2. Table of Contents Page

1. Title page 1
2. Table of Contents 2
3. Summary3
4. Introduction4
5.1 Objective 4
5.2 Background 4
5.3 Methods of Inquiry 4
5.4 Definition of Terms4
5. Reasons Supporting the Use of Offshore Processing of Asylum Seekers6
by Australia
6.5 Prevention of Deaths at Sea 6
6.6.1 ‘No Advantage’ Principle6
6.6 Restriction of Business for People Smugglers6
6. Reasons Against the Use of Offshore Processing of Asylum Seekers
by Australia7
7.7 UNHCR Convention State Responsibilities7
7.8 Inhumane7
7.9.2 Non Signature States as Destinations7
7.9.3 ‘No advantage’ Policy 7
6.3 Ineffective at Achieving Aims 8
7. Conclusions 9
8. Recommendations10
9.9 Increase Quota10
9.10 Policy Change10
9.11 More Funding10
9. Reference List11

3. Summary
The findings and conclusions presented in this report illustrate that implementation of offshore processing can deter asylum seekers from arriving in Australia by boat. By applying the No Advantage policy and choosing undesirable sites for processing, the Australian Government aims to prevent deaths at sea. Offshore processing also stops the success of the illegal people smuggling trade. There are many disadvantages however. Offshore processing neglects the responsibilities outlined in the 1951 refugee convention. The use of indefinite detention and second-grade facilities to deter asylum seekers could be considered inhumane. Whether the policy is effective at preventing deaths at sea is also questionable; as many continue to risk their lives despite the prospects of indefinite detention on Nauru and the Manus Islands. There are three (3) recommendations specified in this report: 1. Increasing the quota of refugees is recommended, this will prevent those who can afford people smugglers from taking the place of other refugees in regional camps. 2. Changing policy, providing a maximum detention period could prevent illness and humanitarian concern. 3. Increased funding in border patrol could prevent deaths at sea without having to provide deterrence.

4. Introduction
This report outlines positive and negative elements of the offshore processing of asylum seekers in Australia.
4.1 Objective
This report examines advantages and disadvantages of the decision by the Australian Government to process asylum seekers offshore and provides recommendations. 4.2 Background
People who seek refuge in developed states to which they are not nationals, are known as asylum seekers. Australia has signed the United Nations High Commission for Refugee’s charters of 1951 and 1967 (Asylum Seekers in the Region of Australia 2012). These charters determine global standards of treatment for asylum seekers, and refugees when integrated into their new nation. Asylum seekers can either seek refuge in UNHCR and regional refugee camps on land or by arriving at the border of other nations by boats. In Australia there has been extensive public debate on people smuggling, deaths at sea and the ethics of offshore processing. Since the Gillard Government dismantled the Howard Governments’ pacific solution, arrivals of refugees by boat have been steadily increasing (Budson & Janes 2012). use of processing centres in Nauru and the Manus Islands has been offered as a solution to the increasing numbers of deaths at sea, and along with the ‘no advantage’ policy aims to discourage asylum seekers from paying people smugglers to reach safety instead claiming refuge in UNHCR and regional refugee camps (Bowen 2012). 4.3 Methods of Inquiry

Research methods where based on newspaper articles and credible electronic sources. 4.4 Definition of Terms
Asylum Seeker:...
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