Of Mice and Men Essay

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Of Mice and Men
Pre-AP English
Character Analysis One of John Steinbeck’s most famous books, Of Mice and Men, is a great story about two friends that travel together and work together. George Milton and Lennie Small go to a ranch, after fleeing Weed, where they end up getting in some trouble. Among the things that happen, Carlson shoots Candy’s old, smelly dog, “to put it out of its misery (47)”. Slim gives Lennie a newborn puppy from his female dog, but the puppy ends up dying. Lennie accidently strangles Curly’s wife to death, while petting her soft hair, causing George to have to kill Lennie. Carlson may be a minor character in Of Mice and Men, but what he does in the story is an important to how the story ends. Carlson’s attitude towards Candy’s dog foreshadows what would happen in the end of the story. Carlson wants Candy’s dog to be killed because the dog can barely move around and smells badly. Carlson says “the ol’ dog jus’ suffers (45)”. Where as Carlson doesn’t really like the dog he still offers to kill it. He says he will shoot the dog in the back of the head so he won’t see it coming and so it won’t feel a thing. When George kills Lennie, in the end of the book, George shoots Lennie in the back of the head just like Carlson does to Candy’s dog. Carlson’s possessions are part of the tragedy in the end. Carlson has a gun, a luger to be exact, which he keeps, in a box, under his cot. The Luger, that belongs to Carlson, and was used to shoot the old dog, was also used to kill Lennie. Had George not been there when Carlson pulled the Luger out from under his cot to kill Candy’s dog, George probably would not have killed Lennie. “I seen it this morning, No, it’s been took (98)” said Carlson when asked where his gun is. Everyone thinks that Lennie took it when really George was the one who stole Carlson’s gun; Lennie was out...
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