Odysseus' Greek Heroic Traits

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  • Topic: Hero, Epic Cycle, Odyssey
  • Pages : 2 (636 words )
  • Download(s) : 558
  • Published : February 19, 2012
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“My heart longs to be home, my comrades’ hearts as well” (Homer 10.533). After a whole twenty years of being away from home, Odysseus with his strong desire to reach his homeland leads his many crew members and himself through the difficulties and obstacles they encounter along the way. Not only does he persevere in this journey, he is a strong warrior, very athletic, and treats his guests well. Odysseus is a legitimate Greek hero. Odysseus is a strong warrior, not only physically but mentally as well. “He steeled himself instead, his mind in full control” (Homer 17.260). By having complete manipulation of his own mind, he knows exactly what he’s doing and how to control himself to react in an appropriate manner. He keeps his emotions in check and knows when and how to react to certain situations. “Square in the back it struck Odysseus, just under the right shoulder but he stood up against it—steady as a rock, unstaggered by Antinous’ blow—just shook his head, silent, his mind churning with thoughts of bloody work” (Homer 17.510-518). He held a steady stance right after he stood up, unaffected by the hit. Even after taking a hit to the shoulder, he still remains silent. Odysseus can still maintain full control of his mind and body, which reveals his strong character. One of the attributes of a Greek hero is athleticism, and Odysseus fits that requirement quite well. When Odysseus arrives home, he is given the opportunity to prove himself to his wife, Penelope. The trial was to pick up Odysseus’ bow and string it with ease. “So they mocked, but Odysseus, mastermind in action, once he’d handled the great bow and scanned every inch, then, like an expert singer skilled at lyre and song—who strains a string to a new peg with ease, making the pliant sheep—got fast at either end—so with his virtuoso ease Odysseus strung his mighty bow” (Homer 21.451-456). After carefully examining his very own weapon, he picked it up and strung it without...
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