Occupational Safety and Health and Social Care Settings

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Understand health and safety in social care settings

Performance Criteria

1. Understand the different responsibilities relating to health and safety in social care settings

1.1. Identify legistation relating to health and safety in social care setting

Current legislation and subsequent amendments may include:

· Health & Safety at Work Act
The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 is the primary piece of legislation covering
occupational health and safety. Under this Act, the employer, the workers and the individuals
being supported have responsibilities to ensure safety is maintained in the workplace. Your
employer should display a copy of this Act on their main premises. The main purpose of the
legislation is:
• To secure the health, safety and welfare of people at work
• To protect others from risks arising from the activities of people at work
• To control the use and storage of dangerous substances
• To control the emission into the atmosphere of noxious or offensive substances
· The Management of Health & Safety Work Regulations
The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992 emphasize what employers are required to achieve under the Health and Safety at Work Act.
· Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH)
require employers to control substances that can harm workers' health.
· Manual Handling Operations Regulations
sets out requirements for manual handling and moving and handling of people.
· The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)
sets out what needs to be reported.
· Personal Protective equipment regulations

1.2. Explain how health and safety policies and procedures protect those in social care settings

These provide help, guidance, safety policies to follow inorder to protect social care settings and keep maintain safety.Your employer may have policies and procedures covering a wide range of health and safety subjects to incorporate the legal requirements. If you work directly for an individual or in a small organisation, it is less likely you will have written policies and procedures. This will mean you will need to use the legal framework as your guide and communicate well with your employer regarding health and safety.

Here are some examples of the subjects that should have health and safety policies and procedures:
• Moving and handling of people and objects
• Personal hygiene
• Infection control
• Personal safety and lone working
• Fire safety
• Food safety and hygiene
• What to do in the event of an emergency
• Risk assessments
• Smoking at work
• Display Screen Equipment (DSE) for people working with computers • Use of chemicals and waste disposal
• Security measures and visitors
Example:
Although you will aim to give personal care and support in as individual a manner as possible, you must always remember that health and safety for everyone involved comes first. For example, an individual may ask to be left in the bathroom alone. You should support this but only if it is safe to do so. You need to consider the risks involved and the individual’s capacity to understand the risks and know how to reduce them. The kinds of risks present at every time you support an individual to take a bath are: • Water that is too hot will cause scalding

• It is possible to drown in a bath
• It is very easy to slip when getting in and out of a bath • Washing products (like shampoo or soap) in the eyes can cause pain • Razors and shaving equipment can cut skin

1.3. Compare differences in the main health and safety responsibilities of:

a.) the social care worker
-Take reasonable care of your health and safety
• Take reasonable care not to put other people, including other employees and members of the public at risk by what you do or don’t do at work
• Co-operate...
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