Observations of Child Development

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This paper will discuss a child that was observed on a number of occasions in their family setting at home. It will explore the student social worker’s understanding of child development linking theory and reality. . A critical account based on six observations sessions of the child development on….. drawing on what has been seen and student knowledge on appropriate milestones, literature research and social work theory. The student will reflect on their role as an observer and what has been learnt during the process of observation and it’s relevance to social work

Different areas of development are inter-related. The ideas, language, communication, feelings, relationships and other cultural elements among which each child is brought up influence his or her development profoundly. (Carolyn Meggitt and Gerald Sunderland) (2000) Child Development : An illustrated guide. Heinemann.

The skills of observation are important and the importance of tone of voice and body language, particularly when the words spoken might be saying something completely different. Sometimes observing teaches you things that you can’t be told and sometimes we are tuned to listen instead of look. A part of the process of becoming a social worker is observation. Observation is the power to see what isn't obvious. Observation is seeing and hearing, and also seeing what’s missing, picking up on what is omitted, analytically processing whilst doing the observation. It’s important we understand observation is a powerful tool in our assessment and intervention. Observing is an essential skill for everyone working with children.( Carolyn Meggitt and Gerald Sunderland) (2000). Observation helps social workers and students to reflect upon situations before intervening (Pat Le Riche and Karem Tanner)

Using observational methods are helpful in describing individual’s behaviour as they interact in real time; and allow the reader to create a verbal picture of the behaviours as they unfold.   This is important when social workers are working with children and families in their home (Pellegrini, 1996:1), and there is a growing recognition in social work literature around observation in practice (Riche & Tanner, 1998:17).   On my first observation I was not nervous but did feel intrusive about entering the Morris’s home, I had meet them a few days before and they were very welcoming which eased some of the anxieties I had.   I know that as a qualified social worker on some occasions (e.g. child protection) I will be meeting the family for the first time when conducting a home visit and they might not be welcoming.   Taking the role of observer is what I was most apprehensive about, I was unsure of what to expect on...

Cognitive and language development

Cognitive or intellectual development is development of the mind- the part of the brain that that is used for recognising, reasoning, knowing and understanding.

Language development is development of communication skills :

Receptive speech: what a person understands
Expressive speech- the words the persons produces
Articulation- the person’s actual pronunctions of words

TC can build towers, can copy a building pattern of three or more cubes

Cognitive and language development

3 years

• Remember and repeat songs and nursery rhymes
• Use personal pronuouns and plurals correctly and give their own name and sex and sometimes age • Carry on simple conversations, often missing link words such as the and is • Learn to speak more than one language if they hear more than one language spoken around them as they grow • Enjoys listening to and making music

• Can control their attention, choosing to stop an activity and return to it without much difficulty • Counts by rote up to ten or more
• Enjoys playing on the floor with bricks, boxes, toy trains and dolls • Joins in active make-believe play
• y with other children

A Child Observation...
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