Obessity as a Social Problem

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Obesity as the Social Problem
Student’s Name
Institution of Learning

Obesity as the Social Problem
Sociologists define social problems from two points of view: objective reality and subjective perception. As an objective reality, a social problem is substantial; it obtains an injurious quality that some people can verify by their own experience. However, a social problem is a matter of personal perception; that is, any issue becomes a social problem depending on how people perceive it (Thio&Taylor, 2012). Thus, one of the most crucial social problems in the healthcare policy of the society is obesity of the population. It is an urgent issue, as the obesity, as well as overweight, causes great number incurable illnesses that leads to the population dying out. Many people will argue that obesity is not a social problem, but personal. There are two ways to define whether a problem is individual or social. The first way deals with numbers. Obesity is entirely social problem, as it is the problem of many people, not of few. Another way deals with causation and confirms that obesity is from top to bottom social problem. As the causes that lead to it are sociological, those are some social forces, such as, for example, widespread media popularization of fast food (p.4-5). It is not a secret that most Americans are overweight and one third are obese. Unfortunately, health statistics informs that although the obesity trend seems to be reducing, the prevalence stays unacceptably high and obesity remains to be a serious national health concern (Kazaks&Stern, 2013). There are many reasons that cause obesity and overweight. Among them increased consumption of foods with saturated fats, harmful products that are nutrient poor, and confectionery and other foods with high levels of sugar, as well as reduced physical activity and extend media propaganda of fast foods. The implications of the obesity are appalling. The...
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