Obesity Article Review

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Research Article Review
Intro to Graduate Research/ Cameron University
June 15, 2010

Summary of Article
This study examined obesity in the school systems and the factors of the trial were food consumption, wellness activities, and stress management. Sixteen schools were chosen for the study, eight control, and eight intervention. At the schools only the staff were measured and took part in the study such as teachers, administrators, teacher aides, and others. The study was testing two hypotheses the first one was that that employees involved in the intervention schools would be more likely to significantly lose weight (lower BMI and waist-hip ratio) than individuals in the control schools and the second hypothesis concerns that people in the intervention schools would be significantly more likely to change diet and physical activity behaviors than individuals at control schools. The instruments used in this study were a calibrated electronic scale, a stadiometer height board to help calculate body mass index (BMI), cloth tape measure to measure waist to hip ratio, and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) Short Form to measure and report time spent in sedentary activity, moderately vigorous activity, vigorous activity, and walking in the prior seven days. The study concluded there were differences in the control and intervention schools but they were not significant. The intervention schools only lost an average of .82 pounds per person while the control schools gained 2.45 pounds per person during the two year study. Reflection of Article

I found this article to be interesting because it studied obesity in schools not with the students but with the faculty and staff. I liked how they looked at more than just how much a person weighed and more at their lifestyle by using the IPAQ form which brought an instrument that brought another degree into the study. I also liked how long the study took which was a over a two year period from 2005...
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