Nutrition and Food Choices

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TDA 2.14 Support children and young people at meal or snack times

1. Know the principles of healthy eating for children and young people 1.1 Outline the nutritional requirement of a healthy diet for children and young people

Childhood and adolescence are periods of rapid physical, social, cognitive and behaviour change. Optimal nutrition during childhood and adolescence is essential for the maintenance of growth and good health. The dietary requirements of children and young people are different to those of adults and are constantly changing as individuals grow and develop.

Establishing good nutrition and physical activity patterns in childhood contributes to good health throughout life. The values, habits and behaviours developed during this period often influence behaviours in adulthood. There is evidence that health during childhood and adolescence impacts on health during adulthood.

Children should not exceed the recommended calorie intake per day; however, it is not always possible in a setting to maintain this as you do not know what children are eating at home, before or after they attend nursery.

Guidelines for calorie intake
Age (years)Calories per day
BoysGirls
1-3 1,2301,165
4-6 1,7151,545
7-10 1,9701,740
11-14 2,2201,845
15-18 2,7552,110

Children also have recommended percentages of food types.
Oils and fats 6%
High protein 11%
Milk and dairy products 17%
Fruit and vegetables 33%
Potatoes and cereals 33%

Maintaining a healthy diet for children is imperative. It has been proven that children’s concentration in school is affected should they skip breakfast and that a sugar high from too many sweet things can also cause a ‘crash’ leaving children lethargic.

1.2 Describe examples of healthy meals and snacks for children and young people

Breakfast
Banana-Cinnamon French Toast
Smoothie
Banana-Nut Muffins
Toasted Egg Smiles
Cereal
Muffin Egg Sandwich
Whole Wheat Pancakes
Apple Raisin French Toast
Breakfast Muffins
Fruit Pizza
Blueberry Crepes with Maple Cream
Yoghurt
Peanut Butter Banana
Snacks:

Vegetable-Based Snacks
Carrot sticks and hummus
Veggie tray with hummus or homemade ranch dressing
Ants on a log – celery filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins Guacamole and corn chips or pita chips

Fruit-Based Snacks
Fruit eaten alone is one of the easiest snacks around!
Apple
Apple chips
Dried fruit
Fruit and cheese tray

Bread, Tortillas, Muffins and Bars
Granola bars

High Protein Snacks
Nuts (a handful of nuts is an excellent source of protein and healthy fat. Lightly toast them for added flavour). Trail mix – toss your favourite fruits and nuts together for a tasty treat. Yoghurt

Sweet Snacks
Fruited yogurt
Mini-Apple pies
Oatmeal cookies
Breakfast Cookies
Lunch
Tinned sardine bagel
Tomato
Kiwi
Bottle of water
Egg and tomato roll
Two oatcakes and low-fat cheese
Carrot sticks
Dried apricots
Semi-skimmed milk
Potato and sausage salad (with spring onion, pine nuts and low-fat plain yogurt) Fruit and low-fat fromage frais
Slices of fruit bread
Pear
Bottle of water
Corned beef sandwich on wholemeal bread
Low-fat soft cheese with vegetable dippers (cucumber sticks, red and green pepper strips) Banana
Yoghurt drink
Wholemeal English muffin pizza (with cheese, cherry tomatoes and spinach) Nectarine
Banana and blueberry smoothie (made with semi-skimmed milk)
Tuna and crunch salad sandwich
Chicken tomato and lettuce salad bagel
Muffin pizza with green salad

Dinner
Chicken and pepper stir fry
Roasted vegetable pasta
Lamb chops with new potatoes and vegetables
Spicy vegetarian curry
Sweet potato shepherds pie
Fish fillet with cherry tomatoes and veg
Chicken, tomato and courgette kebabs
Roast chicken and veg
Salmon fishcakes with carrots and peas
Sausage tomato and pumpkin bake...
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