Nursing Theory

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Do standardised nursing languages/taxonomies provide evidence of nursings distinctive contribution to patient care? Yes, the use of a standardized nursing language for documentation of nursing care is vital both to the nursing profession and to the bedside/direct care nurse {Rutherford 2008}.  In a health care environment where nurses are providing more care to more patients, Dr. Herdman says a standardized nursing language “provides clarity in communication among all professionals caring for that patient which, in turn, leads to a better level of care and improved patient safety.” The International Council of Nurses (ICN) has developed the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) (ICN, 2006) in an attempt to establish a common language for nursing practice. The Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) , which describes the treatments that are performed by nurses; and Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC) which describes patient outcomes sensitivity to various nursing interventions were developed as companion languages. These have linkages to other nursing languages, such as NANDA nursing diagnoses, the Omaha System, and Oasis for home health care, among others. Nurses around the world have been working on developing nursing language (Baernholdt & Lang, 2003; Lang & Clark, 1997) The use of standardized nursing languages has many advantages includes better communication among nurses and other health care providers, increased visibility of nursing interventions, improved patient care, enhanced data collection to evaluate nursing care outcomes, greater adherence to standards of care, and facilitated assessment of nursing competency{Rutherford 2008}. 

Beth Ann Swan, Norma M. Lang, Anne M. McGinley 2004Access to Quality Health Care: Links Between Evidence, Nursing Language, and Informatics Nurs Econ. 2004;22(6):325-332. 
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