Nursing Dress Codes

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  • Topic: Nursing, Nurse, Nurse uniform
  • Pages : 5 (1611 words )
  • Download(s) : 741
  • Published : July 29, 2011
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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to offer a summary and synthesis of some of the more recent research regarding implementing mandatory dress codes. The tradition of nursing attire has changed over the years. The history of nursing uniforms includes wearing solid white skirts, shoes, and white cap. These white garments typically signified nursing roles and differentiated nurses from other staff members. Common questions that arise within medical institutions includes: what are the advantages of implementing mandatory dress codes? Should nurses be required to wear traditional white uniforms? Should personal individuality be preserved? How will patient care be impacted? Regardless of the point of view, most positions tend to agree that it is important for nurses to look profession and presentable at all time. Keywords: nursing uniforms, traditional uniforms, nursing dress codes, nursing professionalism

Implementing Nursing Dress Codes
The purpose of this paper is to offer a summary and synthesis of some of the more recent research regarding implementing mandatory dress codes. In some instances, dress codes may be regarded as necessary in order to maintain the tradition and qualified identity of caregivers. The relevance of this topic applies to the many professional divisions of nursing and related institutions; furthermore, the opposing viewpoints of obligatory nursing dress attire and the methods of implementation will be reviewed. The tradition of nursing attire has changed over the years. The history of nursing uniforms includes wearing solid white skirts, shoes, and white cap. These white garments typically signified nursing roles and differentiated nurses from other staff members. In modern days, controversies continue to emerge regarding nursing dress codes issues. Common questions that arise within medical institutions includes: what are the advantages of implementing mandatory dress codes? Should nurses be required to wear traditional white uniforms? Should personal individuality be preserved? How will patient care be impacted? How to effectively implement change and approach resistance towards changing the dress code? (Cherry & Jacob, 2008). Literature Review Statement of proposed view and counter view An article by LaSala & Nelson (2005) suggests that the discussion of nursing dress codes stems from the ideal professional nursing image. According to Shaw & Timmons (2010), uniforms are thought to hold personal significance for those who wear them and act as powerful symbols representing the profession's identity and image; furthermore, pride, combined with a strong self-image and professional identity, lead to enhanced confidence and, therefore, better performance in clinical practice. In support of this notion, Cherry & Jacob (2008) adds that the work attire of any professional says to the world how significant the task is to the professional.

It is important for nurses to look professional and presentable at all times. According to Bednarski & Rosenberg (2008), appearance and image are important concepts in nonverbal communication; moreover, the current multi-variant uniform styles worn by care providers make it difficult to identify registered nurses. Uniforms are part of a larger dress policy that promotes safety. The typical uniform policy usually includes restrictions for footwear, jewelry, and accessories (Spragley & Francis, 2006). In regards to colors, Spragley & Francis (2006) also argue that white has traditionally been associated with cleanliness and sterility; white uniforms indeed give the impression of being cleaner than other clothing. Even though a white uniform needs to be laundered more frequently, it is no cleaner than other colors and is not likely to contribute to cross infection. There are various reasons why nurses opt out of wearing the traditional white uniforms and wear more colorful attire. Spragley & Francis (2006) states that scrubs continue to dominate the nursing...
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