Nursing Adults with Depression

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It is a misconception that having depression as an elderly adult that live in nursing home is normal. Some would argue otherwise. “Depression affects an estimated of 15% to 19% of Americans ages 65 and older living in a variety of settings, yet the illness often goes unrecognized and unthreatened” According to American Journal of Nursing (2012), “Depression in Older Adults” (p. 22-30). There are also many health risks that can follow depression. Most nurses do not know or see what is happening to their patients. I had something that motivated me to write about this topic while reading some of the articles in the American Journal of Nursing. My inspiration was another nurse wrote a letter to the American Journal of Nursing saying that nursing care as gone drastically downhill. Nurses are caring more about getting as much done as they can other then caring for the patient. It is disappointing that most nurses do not know that depression is not normal with elderly adults. Also, that there can be some health risks that follow depression, but most nurses do not see it that way. First, there is the argument that lots of nurses think that the health risks for depression are unclear and often difficult to conclude which symptoms are caused by depression and which have other causes. I would have to argue that even though this is true and may take more time to getting to know your patients and spending more time with them every day it is your duty as a nurse. Just to show how serious the health risk factors are for depression and that we need to put our best out there for these elderly depressed people. Health risks: suicide, developing disabilities with activities of daily living, low levels of physical activity which will increase their risk of cardiovascular mortality, unhealthy dieting, acute myocardial infarction, Parkinson’s disease, chronic pain, chronic medical conditions, functional decline, family history of depression, social isolation, and substance...
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