Novel vs Novella

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Novel vs Novella

By | June 2013
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A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. A common length is about 50 to 100 pages, or around 20,000 to 40,000 words. The extra length is generally used for more character development than is possible in a short story, but without the much greater character and plot development of a novel. -------------------------------------------------

Novella
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the literary form. For other uses, see Novella (disambiguation). |
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A novella is a written, fictional, prose narrative normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian word "novella", feminine of "novello", which means "new".[1] The novella is a common literary genre in several European languages. |

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Structure [edit]
A novella generally features fewer conflicts than a novel, yet more complicated ones than a short story. The conflicts also have more time to develop than in short stories. They have endings that are located at the brink of change. Unlike novels, they are usually not divided into chapters, and are often intended to be read at a single sitting, as the short story, although white space is often used to divide the sections. They maintain, therefore, a single effect.[2] Warren Cariou wrote: The novella is generally not as formally experimental as the long story and the novel can be, and it usually lacks the subplots, the multiple points of view, and the generic adaptability that are common in the novel. It is most often concerned with personal and emotional development rather than with the larger social sphere. The novella generally retains something of the unity of impression that is a hallmark of the short story, but it also contains more highly developed...