Novartis' Implementation Strategy

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With this implementation strategy, the new system is installed gradually or in one operation but on just small scale. To put simply, the old system will be replaced by the new system in small groups, across similar separate locations. If this is successful, then the pilot is extended until eventually replaces the old system completely. Within each location, the cutover is direct.

* Advantages:
* Easy to control, the pilot can be halt at any time.
* With this strategy, the pilot can be stopped at any time during the implementation process. * Easy to evaluate because the new and old systems are both running. * This implementation approach is also easy to evaluated because the both systems are running in different locations. * Low risk, if a small-scale pilot fails then not too much has been lost. *

* Easy to train staff by letting them learn new skills on the pilot system. *
* Disadvantages:
* It can be slow to get a pilot to completely replace the old system. *
* A pilot may not show up problems that a full-scale implementation would. This is because a system can work well as a small-scale pilot but has difficulties when it is scaled up to a full operating system with more realistic volumes of data to be processed. *

Pros:
* Easy to control, the pilot can be halt at any time. * With this strategy, the pilot can be stopped at any time during the implementation process. * Easy to evaluate because the new and old systems are both running. * This implementation approach is also easy to evaluate because the both systems are running in different locations. •Risk limited to one location at a time

The risk associated with this implementation strategy is limited to one location at a time. If the small-scale pilot fails, lost associated with the failure is not that much. •If it goes well in early units, later units will support If the implementation in...
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