Notes on to Kill a Mocking Bird

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To kill a mocking bird
Atticus successfully taught the children about tolerance and justice. Tolerance and justice are two of the most important lessons effectively taught to the children by Atticus in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Atticus teaches his children not to judge someone unless you look at it from their point of view this is applied to Boo Radley who is actually a good person and also to Mrs. Dubose who is extremely ill.

A good person has great morals and wonderful values. They are honest, dependable and a hard worker. They put others before themself and are always willing to help out.
a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, practices, race, religion, nationality, etc., differ from one's own; freedom from bigotry. 2.
a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward opinions and practices that differ from one's own. 3.
interest in and concern for ideas, opinions, practices, etc., foreign to one's own; a liberal, undogmatic viewpoint. 4.
the act or capacity of enduring; endurance: My tolerance of noise is limited. nce

the quality of being just; righteousness, equitableness, or moral rightness: to uphold the justice of a cause. 2.
rightfulness or lawfulness, as of a claim or title; justness of ground or reason: to complain with justice. 3.
the moral principle determining just conduct.
conformity to this principle, as manifested in conduct; just conduct, dealing, or treatment. 5.
the administering of deserved punishment or reward.
the maintenance or administration of what is just by law, as by judicial or other proceedings: a court of justice. 7.
judgment of persons or causes by judicial process: to administer justice in a community. 8.
a judicial officer; a judge or magistrate.
( initial capital letter ) Also

Tom Robinson is a prime example of a compassionate and tolerant human being. Tom Robinson was also an honest hardworking man, and despite the fact that he was at a disadvantage in society and was wrongly convicted by an unjust court ruling, he died knowing that he was innocent. Scout Finch, the character whose perspective the novel is narrated from, is only a small child and yet even she observed Tom Robinson's exemplary etiquette when she mentions "It occurred to me that in their own way Tom Robinson's manners were as good as Atticus's" (Lee 195). This simple observation says very much about Tom Robinson, not to mention what it says about Scout. First, it says that even though Scout is merely a small child who is unlearned in the ways of the world she is still able to recognize Tom's mannerism, who was a poor and uneducated black man with her father's who was a highly respected white lawyer. Scout was able to tolerate and accept Tom Robinson based on this simple observation. However, she would never have been able to do so if Tom Robinson had not conducted himself in such a way to promote this feeling, which is the second half of the conclusion that Scout's observation was important to the theme of tolerance and acceptance. Tom Robinson's mannerism is extremely important in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird because while he is on display in the courtroom, he is more than just an object of onto which hatred and prejudice is spewed, he is an honest, hardworking, sympathetic man who is able to conduct himself properly according to standards in society. Had Tom Robinson been white, his mannerism would have been commended, but due to the fact that he was black it seems expected. In a sense, Tom Robinson could be responsible for altering the opinion that many of the people in his society had that all blacks were savages and were of a lower class than whites; even if the one person changed by his mannerism was Scout. Scout was not the only person to...
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