Norway's Healthcare

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Healthcare in Norway
Introduction
Norway has a population of just below five million people that enjoy a high standard living in a beautiful country supported by his prosperous economy. Norway is internationally recognized for being advanced in healthcare, and for having a great health system. The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) has declared several times that is the best country to live in. The life expectancy is higher than ever before, the general health is excellent, making for a median age about 40 years. Norway has a universal, public health care system financed by the government of this country with the tax revenues and a national insurance scheme. This insurance it is avaible to all Norwegians that are registred long-term residents. About 35 percent of the state’s budget is spent on the Norwegian health and social welfare system.

Norway’s Numbers
Life expectancy history
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| Male| Female| All|
1960| 71.3| 75.9| 73.6|
1970| 71.0| 77.3| 74.1|
1980| 72.3| 79.2| 75.7|
1990| 73.4| 79.8| 76.5|
2000| 76.0| 81.4| 78.6|
2010| 77.4| 82.9| 80.1|

Death Rate
Country| 2000| 2001| 2002| 2003| 2004| 2005| 2006| 2007| 2008| 2009| 2010| 2011| 2012| Norway| 9.89| 9.83| 9.78| 9.72| 9.51| 9.45| 9.4| 9.37| 9.33| 9.29| 9.26| 9.24| 9.22|

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*This entry gives the average annual number of deaths during a year per 1,000 population at midyear. Norwegian National Insurance Scheme (Folketrydgen)
The System
The National Insurance Administration known as the Trygddetaten is responsible for the National Insurance Scheme (NIS), this insurance guarantees that a very basic level of welfare. The NIS provides benefits for illness, accidents, bodily defects, pregnancy, birth, disability, death, and loss of the breadwinner and also for unemployment and old age. While Norway is not a member of the European Union, is member of the European Economic Area (EEA) follows EU regulations on social security. This allows to citizens from participating countries to have access to the same medical care of the Norwegian citizens. Employees from countries participating int the EEA can become members of the social security system through payment of national insurance. For students from Scandinavian countries and Iceland automatically are members of NIS, if they are currently studying in Norway. Students from other countries can qualify after a year studying in Norway. The Norwegian healthcare is primarly based with a structure geared to three levels: * National

* Regional
* Local
The Ministry of Health and Care Services holds primary responsible for Norway’s healthcare organization and structure and is responsible for the health of Norwegian citizens. There are five regional health authorities, which have the duty to monitor and implement healthcare standards at a regional level. The responsibility for primary healthcare is developed to 434 municipalities. The Norwegian healthcare is not entirely free, the NIS require patients to make certain payments towards medical costs. General practitioners, specialist and prescription medicine require a payment. Certain groups are exempt from any healthcare costs, like pregnant women, new mothers and people suffering from chronic illness. The majority need to pay for dental care, but they are special groups that are exempt. Healthcare facilities in Norway are comprised of public and privately run medical hospitals and clinics mainly confined to dental care and supply of pharmaceutics. While the standard of healthcare facilities in cities and large towns is excellent, provision in some of the more remote areas is not up to the same quality levels and availability may not always be readily found. Visitor to Norway need to bear in mind that there are large areas of Norway which are very remote and access to any form of healthcare can be limited. Public Healthcare

The public healthcare in Norway is financed...
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