North vs. South

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During the 1800s the northern and southern states of the United States started distinguishing themselves. There are many ways in which the two groups of states were becoming different. The northern states were Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maine, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The southern states were Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas. The north and south differentiated in the types of occupations, the view on slavery, and climate. In the South the most popular occupation was a farmer. Naturally, this is because the South had fertile soil and plentiful rain. In comparison, farming would not be as popular in the North because the land was not as fertile and there were not enough frost free days. The North did not approve of slavery. On the contrary, the South viewed slaves as property. Furthermore, blacks in the north were free and were paid to work. However, slaves were bought and sold in the South. Fertile soil and plentiful rain encouraged the spread of agriculture in the South. In contrast, rivers were plentiful in the North. Consequently, mills were built that ran on turbines that were powered by water. In conclusion, the early 1800s was a time of differentiating in the United States. The country was becoming divided by the views and way of living of each portion of the country. Clearly, the type of land greatly impacted the way of life. Hence the North was becoming more advanced than the South intellectually since more effort was needed to produce. The North was advancing especially in their views of slavery. These views and differences eventually become a larger issue that leads to war.
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