Non Sense

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Group 3
(IV- Diamond)
Members:
* Jose Japhet L. Cipriano
* Pamela M. Bendicion
* Gianne T. Gloriani
* Neil Ross R. Santiago
* Christine Mae R. Montenegro
* Lexter Rueda
* Kurt Cruz
* Klark Kwan
Submitted to:
Ms. Pamela Mae Pagcaliwangan

An Evaluation: Greek and Roman Literature
CHAPTER 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND
Introduction
Roman literature, while it lacks the brilliant originality and the delicate beauty which characterize the works of the Great writers, is still one of the great literatures of the world and it possesses an importance for us which are even greater that its intrinsic merits (great as they are) would naturally give it. In the first place, roman literature has preserved to us, Latin translations and adaption, many important remains of Greek literature which would otherwise have been lost, and in the second place, the political Latin power of the Romans, embracing nearly the whole known world, made the Latin language the most widely spread of all languages, and this caused Latin literature to be read in all lands and to influence the literary development of the peoples of Europe. [1] The literature of ancient Rome produced many works of poetry, comedy, tragedy, satire, history and rhetoric, drawing heavily of the traditions of other cultures and particularly on the more matured literally tradition of Greece. Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of Ancient Rome. Long after the Western Roman Empire had fallen, the Latin language continued to play a central role in Western European civilization. Latin literature is conventionally divided into distinct periods. Few works remain of early and old Latin; among these few surviving works, however, are the plays of Plautus and Terence, which many other Latin works, including many by the most prominent authors of the classical period, have disappeared, sometimes being rediscovered after centuries, sometimes not. The period of classical Latin, when Latin literature is widely considered to have reached its peak, is divided into the Golden Age, which comes approximately the period from the start of the 1st century BC up to mid-1st century, and the Silver Age, which extends into 2nd century AD. Literature written after the renaissance, for example, when many classical authors were rediscovered and their style consciously irritated. [2] Above all, Cicero was imitated, and his style praised as the perfect pinnacle of Latin. Medieval Latin was often dismissed as “Dog Latin”; however in fact, many great works Latin literatures were produced throughout late antiquity and the Middle Ages, although they are no longer as widely known as the ancient Romans. For most of the medieval era, Latin was the prominent written language in use in Western Europe. After the Roman Empire split into its Western and Eastern halves, Greek, which had been widely used all over the Empire, faded from use in the west, all the more so as the political and religious distance steadily grew between the Catholic as spoken languages only: the most people do not write, and it seems that it very seldom occurred to those who wrote to write in only language other than another vernacular in their daily life. Very gradually, in the late middle ages and the early renaissance, it became more and more common to write in the western vernaculars. It was probably on after the invention of printing, which made books and pamphlets cheap enough that a mass public would afford them, which made possible modern phenomena such as the news paper, that a large number of people in the west could read and write who were not fluent in Latin. Still many people continued to write in Latin, although they...
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