Noise Pollution

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Sound is essential to our daily lives, but noise is not
What is Noise Pollution?
The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or disturbing sound”.  Sound becomes unwanted when it either interferes with normal activities such as sleeping, conversation, or disrupts or diminishes one’s quality of life.  It is a source of irritation and stress for many people and can even damage our hearing if it is loud enough. Many of us are exposed to stressful levels of noise at home and at work. Noise is on the increase in our society. The fact that you can’t see, taste or smell it may help explain why it has not received as much attention as other types of pollution, such as air pollution, or water pollution.  The air around us is constantly filled with sounds, yet most of us would probably not say we are surrounded by noise.  Though for some, the persistent and escalating sources of sound can often be considered an annoyance.  This “annoyance” can have major consequences, primarily to one’s overall health.    Noise is an inescapable part of modern life.  Traffic on the road, low-flying aircraft, dogs barking, lawn mowers, and music blaring from ghetto blasters are some of the noises polluting our cities. People are noisier now than they were a generation ago.  Most homes now boast at least one television, one radio, a thumping stereo system and a range of noisy household appliances. Judging by the number of complaints made to authorities, Australians are becoming increasingly irritated by urban noise.  In Sydney there are over 100,000 noise complaints a year, most of which relate to noisy neighbours. But it is not just the number of complaints that is on the rise.  There has also been a sharp increase in noise litigation, with people prepared to take legal action to protect their peace and quiet.  Of even greater concern is the effect excessive noise can have on the physical and psychological well-being of people. In large cities like Hyderabad, Visakhapatnam, Tirupati, and Vijayawada where the traffic is heavy, the noise levels are above 90 decibels, which is far higher than the tolerable limit. Noise pollution some limits and facts

* Humans can hear only up to 60-65 decibels without damage to the ears. * Noise- induced hearing impairment is called noise induced sensorial hearing loss (NIHC). * When one is subjected to sound of 80 or more decibels for an extended period of time, hearing problems are sure to occur. * Only dogs and cats can bear more noise.

Cinema Theaters And Noise Pollution
When one is subjected to sound of 80 or more decibels for an extended period of time, hearing problems are sure to occur.

Cinema theaters are for our entertainment but they should not threaten our hearing abilities. The noise limit in theatres is 85 decibels. If the noise is more than tolerable, we may suffer partial bearing impairment. Theaters should not be permitted to function at places like crossroads where the noise is already high. Nor should they be allowed near educational institutions, hospitals and other places where silences should be maintained. That is why legally they are prohibited to function at such zones, and we must build up public opinion to implement the prohibition. Health Effects

Noise pollution adversely affects the lives of millions of people.  Studies have shown that there are direct links between noise and health.  Problems related to noise include stress related illnesses, high blood pressure, speech interference, hearing loss, sleep disruption, and lost productivity.  Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is the most common and often discussed health effect, but research has shown that exposure to constant or high levels of noise can cause countless adverse health affects.

Reducing noise at home
Although the amount of noise made by any one person or household may seem negligible, it can make a real difference to the comfort of neighbours and even other members of the household. The following...
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