Nobody Like a Copycat

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Nobody Likes a Copycat
Due to the amount of information readily available through websites and online libraries, the problem with plagiarism has become a major ethical issue in today's academic environment. David Callahan, author of Cheating Culture (Macklem, 2006), states "Widespread cheating is undermining some of the most important ideals of American society." With the continuous rise of academic challenges students are pressured more to look towards faster and more convenient ways of research and writing. Conveniently, while students are completing their research, many subjects have topics that represent their thoughts so perfectly that they can not put it in their own words. And instead of taking the effort to word the information differently or citing references correctly they are in violation of copyright laws, the act known as plagiarism. Professors and faculty members are faced with the need to stop this unethical behavior by first coming to the realization that plagiarism is a problem in today's academic society and the reasons behind the student's behavior and then deciding on the best way to stop plagiarism from getting out of control.

The negative impact with the growing trend of plagiarism not only affects the faculty members in today's academic society but the students as well. According to a study conducted by Duke University's Center for Academic Integrity (Vencat, Overdorf, and Adams, 2006), internet plagiarism has quadrupled in the past six years. The growing amount of information available for students to gain knowledge online is making it harder for professors to check references and possible plagiarism. In a 1999 survey, 10% of students admitted to plagiarizing off the Internet, that number rose to 41% in 2001 (Toosi, 2004). One could assume that the alarming rate of increase could possibly be due to the student's lack of guilt in admitting to plagiarism instead of the overall increase in the amount of plagiarism itself. Whether this assumption is valid or not, the situation at hand is still a growing dilemma and is not committed primarily by the lower-achieving students but the high-achieving students that have the most to gain (Toosi, 2004). The deterioration of ethics in the academic world cannot wholly be blamed on the students; fore the administration is responsible for taking actions against these methods. Collegiate studies showed that nearly 88% of faculty members admitted they observed some form of cheating and that only 32% of those members did anything about the situation (Morales, 2000). Many professors rather have a favorable evaluation from students than to deal with the hassles of trying to prove that a student has committed plagiarism. These hassles include lack of support from the administration and fears of being sued by student who are acquitted of any charges (Morales, 2000). What good is to teach that plagiarism is ethically wrong when the professors who teach this fundamental value will not take the steps to correct the problem? These students who commit plagiarism whether it is from laziness or from not being taught correctly on proper citation are the leaders of the future. A very disturbing thought if one thinks about it.

The World Wide Web with its vast and seemingly unlimited resources of knowledge harbor sites that make money for creating ideas and writing research and term papers for students. A student can easily purchase an "original" essay from or have experts in India complete computer-programming homework from (Vencat et al. 2006). With the wide spread use of the Internet throughout the campuses and the pressures of deadlines on students, especially during then end of term, this booming business of buying and selling of plagiarized work is being used more often. Students only have to look to search engines such as Google to find sites like or that offer thousands of subjects to...
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