No Sugar Language

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All stage dramas are written to portray themes, and one of the tools that the author has to create these themes is the use of spoken language. 'No Sugar', by Jack Davis is a stage drama which uses many different techniques of spoken language in order to shape the numerous themes that it presents. The use of tone, Nyoongah, which is the native Aboriginal language of Western Australia, expletives, slang language and idioms all compile in different ways to shape the themes in Davis' 'No Sugar'. Some of the themes presented through the use of these spoken language techniques are inhumanity, inequality, discrimination, cultural identity and European domination, all of which play a part in shaping the audiences reaction towards the text Davis uses a range of different types of languages techniques in the play "No Sugar", which include the Nyoongah language, formal English, informal English, and tone to shape the readers response. The native Nyoongah language is used frequently throughout the play by the aborigines to show their defiance and resilience to the white culture thrust upon them. After being taken from their homes and put into settlements, the aborigines (in particular, the Millimurra family), use the Nyoongah language to rebel against the white people and to practice one of their few forms of power. "Koorawoorung! Nyoongahs corrobein' to a wetjala's brass band!" is an example of the Nyoongah language used by the character Sam (the father of the Millimurra family). The reader is encouraged by Davis to have a positive attitude towards the aborigines, as they are fighting for their cultural identity by incorporating their native tongue into the "Wetjala's" or whites' English language. This further reinforces the reader's values towards cultural identity and negative attitude towards cultural discrimination. The full use of the Nyoongah language in an entire sentence is used less frequently throughout play. This is to keep the reader interested and to...
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