No Need to Fear Death: a Look in "The Trial and Death of Socrates"

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People have a choice whether to believe or not believe in the existence of the world and in those who question people's knowledge. Socrates is a firm believer in questioning the universe and every aspect that exist within it. From justified true belief to immortality of the soul, Socrates dedicated his life to form opinions, challenge other people's thoughts, and to asking all the questions. In The Trial and Death of Socrates, particular in the dialogues from Crito and Apology, Plato explored Socrates argument that the purpose of philosophy is to prepare for death without fear.

In Plato's Crito, he describes Socrates, an Athenian philosopher, who chose to die for an ideal. When Socrates states his case to his fellow peers, he is told that he may be acquitted if he agrees to stop practicing philosophy. However, he is unyielding, saying that God commands him to find the truth. Philosophy, which has the goal to improve the soul above all other things, is the very essence of life, Socrates explains. Socrates asserts that his death sentence is actually more troubling for his fellow Athenians than for himself. He sees himself as a public servant who helps the city by his practice of philosophy.

Most importantly, Socrates proclaims through his death that respect for the law bypasses his own motives. In a dialogue between Crito and Socrates, Socrates ask Crito if we (people) could live having an evil and corrupted body and "will life be worth having if that higher part of man be depraved, which is improved by justice and deteriorated by injustice?" (Plato 48), in which Crito exclaimed no. Socrates believed that if he was to ever disobey the law, then he would be rendering evil for evil, a philosophy he does not personally believe. Socrates gives the argument that by disobeying the law, he would be disobeying the very people who gave him life. The law provided matrimony which would allow for his parents to marry and have children, and education so that Socrates...
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