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No Men Are Foreign

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  • August 2012
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No Men Are Foreign
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'No men are foreign' tell us that we should not consider anyone as foreign or 'strange.' Humanity is the same all over the world and in harming anyone we are harming ourselves.

This poem emphasizes the fact that men might belong to different races, nations, but are basically bound by a common bond i.e. they all feel pain when hurt and shed tears on the loss of someone close and wars should not break this common bondage. In destroying another country we are destroying our own Earth. The poem tells us to look upon humanity as unified entity.

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The poem is obviously a strong plea for universal brotherhood. It underlines the fact that the people of different countries have same physical, mental & emotional experiences. Their fate is the same. They are in no way different even though they wear different clothes & speak different languages. Nobody should be viewed as stranger & no country foreign. The poet emphasizes the futility of hating those who belong to other countries. When we wage war against others, we only defile our own earth. The dust & smoke caused by war weapons pollute the very air we all breathe. The poet calls upon the people to liberate the world from man-made barriers and parochialism (narrow outlook). There is much in common between different races of the world. [pic]

This poem is written to foster feelings of fraternity, brotherhood and to emphasise that people of different nations are alike in every manner-fate, times of sorrows and happiness etc. Therefore James Kirkup has written this poem to say that we are the children of the God and should we desecrate our Earth by waging wars, by fighting we are condemning ourselves. -----------------------

Poet: James Kirkup
The Theme
The poem “No Men Are Foreign”, a poem by James Kirkup states that no man is foreign or strange and we should not regard anyone as foreign or strange. The poem...