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No Country for Old Men Movie Review

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No Country for Old Men Movie Review

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  • April 26, 2013
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“No Country for Old Men,” is the cinematic adaption of Cormac McCarthy’s identically titled 2005 novel. Written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen in 2007, this film boasts an all-star cast caught up in an eerie, intertwining cat and mouse game. For a movie with no music and very limited verbal script, it is the Holy Grail of spine chilling thrillers. The cinematography follows the novel identically from scene to scene. The creepy landscapes, filming momentum, mind boggling attention to detail and pristine acting all contribute to this being a nightmare you are convinced is your own until the final credits.

The story is set in a rural 1980’s Texas and follows the interweaving paths of three main characters. Llewelyn Moss, a hunter and welder played by Josh Brolin, unexpectedly stumbles upon 2.4 million dollars in the midst of a Mexican desert heroin deal gone wrong. Without a doubt the most terrifying character of the movie is Anton Chigurh, a morally imbalanced, sociopathic hit man played flawlessly by Javier Bardem. If his haircut, slow movement and empty facial expressions aren’t enough to scare the shit out of you, then his cold hearted mind games and varying methods of murder will. Anton Chigurh is sent to track down Llewelyn Moss and the money, using his psychotic antics and a tracking device that was hidden in the briefcase full of money. This turns into a gut-wrenching hunt full of terrifying moments properly displayed as only the Coen brothers see fit. The only notable buffer between the two is Sheriff Ed Tom Bell portrayed by the famous Tommy Lee Jones. Serving as an in and out main character and partial narrator, he tells of the changing times through law enforcement and crime while reflecting on his own life. After investigating the site of the large desert heroin massacre, he comes to uncover the “types of sons a bitches” hunting Moss and swears to intervene before the worst happens. The greatest attribute of this film is its comparison to two...