No Child Left Behind Act

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The No Child Left Behind Act
Alexis Cross
His 324
Dr. Stephan Law
February 20, 2010

No Child Left Behind

1. Introduction
a. What I will be writing about
b. Why I chose my topic
c. What will be covered
2. The NCLB Act
d. How it came to be
e. What was proposed
f. How it has been enacted
3. The NCLB Act
g. Arguments in favor of
h. Arguments against
4. Statistics
i. How the NCLB Act has had a positive impact on education j. How the NCLB Act has had a negative impact on education 5. Proposal
k. Proposals from different resources on how to change the NCLB Act l. The implications of such change
m. What is currently being done towards such change
6. Conclusion
n. What the NCLB Act proposed
o. How it was enacted
p. Debates that arose and still exist
q. Summary of findings
r. Ways its being changed
s. My views

No Child Left Behind
Every parent wants to have the best education possible. State and local government have always been responsible for education from kindergarten through 12th grade. The federal; government was more for equality of education. The federal government, state and local authorities have all proposed ways to make education better for everyone. The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) act was proposed just for that reason. Even though it was proposed by the federal government, the states still set the standards for the testing. Since the proposal and enforcement of the act, there has been a great debate about the effectiveness; however there is data that shows the constructiveness of this act outweighs the pessimistic views.

I chose to write about the NCLB because it affects all school, including the one my children attend, and there is a great debate on the effectiveness. I will be mentioning how this act came to be, the intentions of the act, the negative and positive views, the impact it has made, and what is currently being done with this act. I will be using several resources to give statistical data about the need and effectiveness and to show the positives of this act. This act is very important because it measures the education of our children’s through adequate yearly progress reports and assessments; it stresses accountability of the student and teacher, and involves teacher quality. Without this act there would be little effort put forth to close the educational achievement gap for all children, especially those who are at risk. The Act

No Child Left Behind Act
The No Child Left Behind Act was proposed during the Clinton Administration, but was never acted upon. It finally got passed in 2001 by congress under the Bush Administration with bipartism support. This act fulfilled the goals of President Bush’s educational reform by calling for higher standards and assessment of student achievement. In the History of Education textbook (2007) Pulliam and VanPatten point out that “the bill was co sponsored in 2001 by representatives John A. Buehner (R.Ohio), George Miller (D. California), and Senators Edward Kennedy (D.Massachuetts, and Judd Gregg (R. New Hampshire). Bush signed it the following year” (pg.310). The NCLB act has several components to it. It requires annual testing to measure proficiency in classes such as reading and math from third to eighth grade and once again in high school in any grade other then ninth, this includes three different tests that need to be taken during high school to prove proficiency. The NCLB act also has an impact on the type of funding given to schools for programs such as Title I, reading programs for grades K-3, and grants for technology and bilingual education. In accountability and student mobility under Title I of the NCLB, Weckstein (2003) states “if a student’s academic proficiencies are not properly assessed, there is an unlikelihood that his or her academic needs will be...
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