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NIXON & WATERGATE

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NIXON & WATERGATE
After the break in at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters on the Watergate Office Complex Nixon’s top aides H.R Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman were forced to resign by President Nixon in a meeting held at Camp David on a spring day. Richard G. Kleindienst resigned at the same time as Haldeman and Ehrlichman. The immediate reactions to the resignations were ones of relief due to the internal housecleaning. House minority leader at the time Gerald Ford thought the resignations were important first steps concerning the Watergate affairs. President Nixon gave nothing but praises for the three men. Attorney General Kliendienst resigned because he had close ties to other people named for having something to do with the ongoing Watergate investigation. The people behind Kliendienst’s decision included the former Attorney General John N. Mitchell; he ran President Nixon’s re-election campaign during the Watergate bugging issue. President Nixon referred to Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Ehrlichman as two of his most trustworthy assistants while in the White House. In my opinion he had a peculiar way of showing it. Nixon later in an interview said he forced Mr. Haldeman to resign because he stole three hundred and fifty thousand dollars. He later advised him how to defend himself. He also advised Mr. Ehrlichman in the same attorney manner. Mr. Ehrlichman and Mr. Haldeman agreed in their letters of resignations to cooperate with the investigation being conducted by the Department of Justice. They both agreed to meet with the U.S Attorneys and the Senate Select Committee who were investigating Watergate. Mr. Haldeman was found guilty of conspiracy and obstruction of justice; he served eighteen months in jail for his participation in Watergate. Mr. Ehrlichman was thought to have run the special investigation unit designed to eliminate media leaks also known as the Plumbers.

NIXON & WATERGATE
He was charged with planning and carrying out the...