Nintendo Wii Case Study

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Nintendo Wii
Case Study

DeVry University
Professor Earnhardt

11/13/11

Executive Summary

This marketing plan is looking at Nintendo's Wii. This innovative hardware has really changed the way people, young and old, look at gaming. Considering the Wii has only been out since 2006 this is an extraordinary feat. Nintendo has been keeping gaming alive since 1985 with the release of the original Nintendo (Famicom in Japan) and still keeps the true spirit of gaming alive today.

Situation Analysis
Internal Environment
Key Executive
The board of directors includes the following people:
-Satoru Iwata: President and Representative Director
-Reggie Fils-Aime: President, Chief Operating Officer, and Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing of Nintendo of America Inc. -Tatsumi Kimishima: Director, President of Nintendo of America Inc. and Director of Nintendo Inc.

-Elichi Suzuki; Managing Director and Director
Board of Directors
-Satoru Iwata
-Tatsumi Kimishima
-Masaharu Matsumoto
-Elichi Suzuki
-Yoshihiro Mori
Employees
Nintendo has a large number of employees ranging from hardware based people to software based people, programmers to business people, and the thinkers and the doers. The employees keep Nintendo alive and thriving. External Environment

Customers
Without the support of customers ages 3-120, Nintendo Wii would be sitting on store shelves collecting dust and losing money for Nintendo. Competitors
The two main rivals to the Nintendo Wii are Sony's PlayStation 3 and Microsoft's Xbox 360. Without this competition, Nintendo may not be to the point that it is now. It could rest on its laurels and not supply its customers with newest and greatest ideas. Media

The media can at times be a business’s enemy or a friend. Regardless which side it is on at any given time, the publicity the media gives helps position Nintendo and its products into the minds of consumers. Suppliers

Nintendo doesn't make all of its own parts. It buys...
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