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Nimmo Receptor-Tonus Method vs. Sacro-Occipital Technique

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Nimmo Receptor-Tonus Method vs. Sacro-Occipital Technique

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  • Feb. 2007
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Nimmo Receptor-Tonus Method vs. Sacro-Occipital Technique

When examining and researching the techniques and methods behind both Nimo Receptor-Tonus Method vs. Sacro-Occipital Technique, I found many likes and differences. Although they are two entirely different techniques, they both are formatted to treat subluxation in the spinal column and were started and theorized to reduce pain and increase comfort levels. The Nimmo Receptor-Tonus Method entails Trigger Point Therapy and is used mostly in the soft tissues; whereas, Sacro-Occipital Techniques are used at the ends of the spinal column targeting cerebrospinal fluid build-ups and ultimately trying to decrease and eliminate the build-up. Overall, both techniques are successful and are used everyday for different types of back pain.

Nimmo Receptor-Tonus Method (NRTM) was theorized in the 1950s by Raymond L. Nimmo, D.C. He was not happy with the results he was getting from the original chiropractic methods of manipulation, and decided to think outside the feild of his prior research and studying. At first his methods were not popular by the people, and it took a while for it to be accepted. Nimmo's technique was to simultaneously release trigger points in the neck and head so as to reduce subluxation and pain. His methods use his own body parts, (i.e. thumb, elbows,) and a "nimmo tee" designed specifically for his techniques. He theorized that "chronically hypertonic muscles were the cause of most patients complients." In using this hypothesis, he created a way to remove these termed "trigger points" that took over the nervous system, that were caused by many different things ranging from emotional stress to muscular overload. His treatments consisted of elongated pressure applied to the area of discomfort for a few seconds to remove the ‘knots' and ultimately the pain caused by these trigger points. (1,2,3,4)

Major Bertrand DerJarnett created a theory and technique to approach a completely...