Nike: Mythology Allusion

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Mythology Allusion

The popular athletic brand, Nike, is commonly known to people in this day and age, however some may be unsure as to what it means and its origin. Nike was the winged goddess of victory. She was believed to be able to run and fly and incredible speeds ( goddessnike.com). She was one of four daughters, Zelos (rivalry), Kratos (strength), and Bia (force). Their father was Pallas who was the Titan god of warcraft. Their mother was Styx who was the goddess of the River Styx and was also personified as hatred ( theoi.com). During the start of the Titan War, Zeus was gathering allies to fight against the Titans. The Goddess then gave her daughters into his service. All four daughters were appointed as sentinels to stand beside his throne. Nike was also appointed as his charioteer. Other than this event, Nike never really acquired any mythology of her own, however she was closely identified with the goddess Athena and sometimes appeared as an attribute to her ( theoi.com).

Since the name Nike is attributed to victory, it is understandable why it was chosen to describe an athletic company who’s customers primarily participate in competitive events. However it is questionable to whether or not they do, in fact, enhance the consumers performance and ensure them as the victor. Regardless, The iconic “swoosh” symbol that appears on every Nike product is still associated with the undefeated winged goddess along with the unforgettable slogan “Just Do It”. The image of Nike is even the inspiration of the “swoosh” symbol. The logo represents the wing of Nike herself and was the source of inspiration for great and courageous warriors ( logoblog.org). The stylish, lightweight athletic shoes that Nike Inc. is famous for seem to reflect the speed and agility that Nike is believed to have and will constantly be reminded to those who wear the popular apparel.

Work Cited Page

1.) “Nike.” theoi.com. Web. <http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Nike.html>...
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