Night

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Ultimately, Night by Elie Wiesel was a whirlwind of emotions. Although the most prevalent emotion displayed throughout his entire memoire was fear. This memoire exemplifies the most disturbing of fears experienced by the victims during the Holocaust: Fear of the certainty of losing each other was indefinite, as was fear of pain experienced, and lastly fear of death.

Although fear of pain and death were always existent, the captives of these work camps were always fearful of losing friends and family. Even before Elie and his family entered the work camps, fear of losing each other was apparent,

“I wanted to return to Sighet to describe to you my death so that you might ready yourselves while there is still time...But I wanted to warn you.”(Wiesel 7)

When Moishe the Beadle had a near death experience, he returned to Sighet for the single purpose of being fearful that Elie and the kind people of Sighet would be lost. He could not bear to have them experience the same as he had. Another example that displays fear of losing each other would be when the Wiesel family inhabit the small ghetto (Wiesel 20), and a former maid known as Maria finds them and begs the Wiesel family to take refugee with her family. This shows how Maria was trying in earnest to not lose her dear friends by offering them protection. In the same manner, the Wiesel family did not want to endanger Maria or separate themselves. Thus by rejecting Maria’s offer they did not have to fear losing each other as they were together. Even though fear of losing each other was most prominent in the beginning, it was also associated to fearing pain.

Moreover, fear for pain was neck and neck with fear for losing each other. Upon entering these work camps, Elie had associated the initial shock/fear of the monstrosities he had seen and the pain that had been inflicted immediately after.

“Dozens of inmates were there to receive us, sticks in hand, striking anywhere, anyone, without reason.” (Wiesel...
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