Newspaper Industry Analysis

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SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROJECT ON
Comparative Readership Survey on Retail Subscription

CONTENTS TABLE
CHAPTER| PARTICULARS| PAGE NO.|
CHAPTER 01| 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY| 07|
CHAPTER 02| 2. INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY| 08-12|
| 2.1.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPANY| 13-18|
| 2.1.2INTRODUCTION TO THE PROJECT| 19-27|
| 2.2 OBJECTIVES| 28|
| 2.2 METHODOLOGY| 29|
| 2.3 SAMPLING DESIGN AND SAMPLE SIZE| 30-31|
| 2.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE REPORT| 32|
CHAPTER 03| 3.1 ANALYSIS & FINDINGS| 33-37|
CHAPTER 04| 4.1 CONCLUSIONS| 38|
| 4.2 RECOMMENDATIONS & SUGESSTIONS| 39|
ANNEXURES| QUESTIONNAIRE| 40-43|
| BIBLIOGRAPHY| 44|

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Newspaper Industry can be said as the most trusted Industry as people believe whatever is written in the newspaper as facts and day to day happenings. My motive was to broaden the spectrum of trust and acquire more customers for Business Standard Newspaper For every industry to be successful in its domain, it is necessary that a detailed analysis be done regarding its customers, the competitive environment, the customer’s preferences and the demand. This was perhaps one of the most important purposes of my project i.e. to collect a primary data. My job was to meet the Managers of Banks and various other Financial Institutions, get their feedback on Business Standard and other financial dailies they read and explain them the subscription plan. It was a great learning experience on field. I got hands – on exposure to sales and the response of the people with whom I interacted help me in a great way to get a proper analytical data for concluding my project. The project put light on some facts and helped me understand the customer behavior and their preferences.

INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUSTRY

HISTORY OF THE NEWSPAPER INDUSTRY:
The history of newspapers is a dramatic chapter of the human experience going back some five centuries. Before the invention of newspapers in the early 17th century, official government bulletins were circulated at times in some centralized empires. In Ancient Rome, Acta Diurna, or government announcement bulletins, were made public by Julius Caesar. They were carved in metal or stone and posted in public places. In China, early government-produced news sheets, called tipao, circulated among court officials during the late Han dynasty (second and third centuries AD). Between 713 and 734, the Kaiyuan Za Bao ("Bulletin of the Court") of the Chinese Tang Dynasty published government news; it was handwritten on silk and read by government officials. In 1582 there was the first reference to privately published newssheets in Beijing, during the late Ming Dynasty. In Early modern Europe the increased cross-border interaction created a rising need for information which was met by concise handwritten newssheets. In 1556, the government of Venice first published the monthly Notizie scritte, which cost one gazetta. These avvisi were handwritten newsletters and used to convey political, military, and economic news quickly and efficiently to Italian cities (1500–1700) — sharing some characteristics of newspapers though usually not considered true newspapers. However, none of these publications fully met the classical criteria for proper newspapers, as they were typically not intended for the general public and restricted to a certain range of topics.

ASIA’S ROLE IN THE NEWSPAPER INDUSTRY

Worldwide newspaper sales edged up by more than two percent in 2007 while advertising revenue recorded significant gains, according to the World Association of Newspapers. In its report on trends in the newspaper industry, the WAN said nearly 515 million copies of newspapers were sold daily in 2007 and read by an estimated more than one billion people worldwide. China, India and Japan were the world's biggest newspaper markets in 2007 and China overtook Japan as the country with the highest number of publications in...
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