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Newspaper Article
Daily Life at ANZAC Cove
War correspondent Roger Tan reports on the two days at Gallipoli. All information that has been released to the public on the ongoing war at Gallipoli has been indefinite. Soldiers are unable to send any news except that they are still on Gallipoli in the trenches and are under fire. Question is “But what is it really like in Gallipoli?”

On Sunday April 25th 1915, the Gallipoli war commenced as the Anzacs set foot into the battlefield. At 4:30am four battleships were in line, at about 3000 yards off shore. The signal was given for the tows to be cast off, and to make their own way to the beaches. Unknown to the men on the landing barge, they had drift two kilometres north of the decided location. The element of surprise has been lost by British naval bombardment of the coast. Due to that, although the Turks had poor defence and poor artillery with no aircraft, they were prepared. As 16 000 men landed on Anzac cove, the small beach became congested. These men were faced with heavy crossfire from well-positioned Turks on cliff tops. “Bullets struck fireworks out of the stones along the beach. The men did not wait to be hit, but wherever they landed they simply rushed straight up the steep slopes. These occupied the attention of the Turks in the trenches, and almost before the Turks had time to collect their senses, the first boatloads were well up towards the trenches. Some Turks awaited the bayonet” - Charles Bean - honorary captain in the AIF. By sun rise the first Australians had reach the ridge. Murderous fights continued all morning. By afternoon the Turks were spraying the beach with two field guns causing heavy casualties.. Stretcher bearers carried away the wounded men downhills to a hospital near the quarters while, men carried ammunition uphills on the same path. Conditions of each soldier were appalling. Many suffered form lack of sleep . “In the early hours of the morning I head the officer going along...
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