New Developments in Technology Management

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Academy of Management Learning & Education, 2009, Vol. 8, No. 3, 324 –336.

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New Developments in Technology Management Education: Background Issues, Program Initiatives, and a Research Agenda PHILLIP H. PHAN The Johns Hopkins University DONALD S. SIEGEL University at Albany, SUNY MIKE WRIGHT Nottingham University Business School and Erasmus University, Rotterdam We provide background information on key developments and trends in technology management education, including the managerial implications of recent public policy changes designed to stimulate investment in technology and entrepreneurship. We then consider the educational implications of these trends, drawing on lessons learned from papers in the special issue and our own research. Finally, we outline an agenda for future research on technology management education.

........................................................................................................................................................................ INTRODUCTION The teaching of technology management has a long history in business schools. However, the nature and focus of such curricula have changed in recent years, due to several trends. The rise of a knowledge-based economy has brought greater attention to the management and commercialization of intellectual property (Markman, Siegel, & Wright, 2008). Questions regarding the appropriate business models to foster successful commercialization have been further complicated by the rise of “open-source” innovation (e.g., Linux, a software company that has captured substantial market share). And new institutions (e.g., incubators and science parks; Phan, Siegel, & Wright, 2005) and new organizational forms (e.g., research joint ventures [RJVs], and technology alliances) have emerged that may also have profound effects on technology management education. Nonprofit institutions, most notably universities and federal laboratories, have become much more aggressive in protecting and exploiting their intellectual property (Siegel & Wright, 2007). Such institutions, es324 Copyright of the Academy of Management, all rights reserved. Contents may not be copied, emailed, posted to a listserv, or otherwise transmitted without the copyright holder’s express written permission. Users may print, download or email articles for individual use only.

pecially universities, are also working much more closely with industry and government. These trends and growing involvement of government and nongovernmental institutions in innovation and commercialization have led to growing international recognition of the narrowness of technology management education as it is practiced today. Some business and engineering schools have responded to these developments by designing new courses and curricula related to technological entrepreneurship. Some countries with centralized educational systems (e.g., Japan, Singapore, and Ireland) are graduating “bilingual engineers” with capabilities in technology and business. Yet, this trend of marrying technology with management education is still far from being in the mainstream. Another important development in stimulating and changing the nature of the demand for technology management education is the rise of knowledge and intellectual property management as a professional field. In many countries, national governments have supported these initiatives by en-

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acting legislation to facilitate public–private research partnerships, technology transfer (through patenting and licensing) from universities to firms (e.g., the Bayh–Dole Act of 1980), and collaborative research. For example, the EU, China, and Singapore have established technology-based venture funds to stimulate the development of technologybased...
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