Neurotransmitters on Physical and Mental Behavior

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on Physical and Mental Behavior
Maureen Haynes
PSY 350
Prof: Alina Perez-Sheppe
Aug 8, 2011

Neurotransmitters on Physical and Mental Behavior
Our physical and mental behavior is controlled by what is called Neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters are described as free floating chemicals in our brain transmit signals in the synapse, a junction that permits a neuron to pass electrical signals to other cells. In this paper I will identify four major neurotransmitters, such as the dopamine, acetylcholine, gaba and glutamate. Plus, I will analyze their function, and evaluate their impact on physical and mental behavior.

Neurotransmitters are stored in minute sac called vesicles located at the end of axons. When an impulse, reaches the end of the axon, the vesicles discharge a neurotransmitter into a space between the cells. Also, neurotransmitters spread across the synapse and attach to receptors in the receiving cell that are designed for the neurotransmitter. Furthermore, the cell may be stimulated or the opposite may occur which can inhibited the cell from transmitting the impulse. (science. Jrank.org, 2011)

The neurotransmitter dopamine is stored in the synapse vessels and is prevalent in the brain and the nervous system. Also, it is involved in muscle control and function, and when dopamine levels are low, it can cause loss of motor. In addition, it can cause depression, addictions, cravings, compulsions, low sex drive, poor attention and focus. (Integrative Psychiatry, 2011)

The neurotransmitter acetylcholine carries nerve impulses across an opening between the synapse. “Acetylcholine is also one of the neurotransmitters that play a very important role in memory” “its main use if for control of sensory input signals and muscular control.” It is also known as a stimulatory neurotransmitter. Also, when muscle nerves release acetylcholine, it makes the muscles contract. The drugs Tolterodine, SSRIs and...
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